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The Stock Market and Capital Accumulation

  • Robert E. Hall

If firms purchase capital up to the point where there is no further marginal benefit, and the firms' securities are equal in value to the capital, then the market value of securities measures the quantity of capital. I explore the implications of this hypothesis using data from U.S. non-farm, non-financial corporations over the past 50 years. The hypothesis implies that corporations have formed large amounts of intangible capital, especially in the past decade. The resources for expanding capital have come from the output of the existing capital. An endogenous growth model can explain the basic facts about corporate performance, with only a modest increase in the productivity of capital in the 1990s.

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Paper provided by National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc in its series NBER Working Papers with number 7180.

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Date of creation: Jun 1999
Date of revision:
Publication status: published as American Economic Review, Vol. 91, no. 5 (December 2001): 1185-1202
Handle: RePEc:nbr:nberwo:7180
Note: EFG PR
Contact details of provider: Postal: National Bureau of Economic Research, 1050 Massachusetts Avenue Cambridge, MA 02138, U.S.A.
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