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A Theory of the Cross-Sectional Fertility Differential: Jobs f Heterogeneity Approach

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  • Daishin Yasui

    () (Graduate School of Economics, Kobe University)

Abstract

This paper presents a theory of the cross-sectional fertility differential, which produces the negative wage-fertility relationship based on jobs f heterogeneity. Compared to the existing literature, the theory not only captures the realistic situation where productivity and working conditions differ across jobs, but also requires only standard conditions on preferences to generate the negative relationship. Moreover, the result is robust to changes in economic environments (e.g., public policy and technology). The theory reconciles the negative cross-sectional wage-fertility relationship with various time-series variation in the aggregate fertility. Furthermore, this study adds an important viewpoint to the empirical literature.

Suggested Citation

  • Daishin Yasui, 2014. "A Theory of the Cross-Sectional Fertility Differential: Jobs f Heterogeneity Approach," Discussion Papers 1409, Graduate School of Economics, Kobe University.
  • Handle: RePEc:koe:wpaper:1409
    as

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    File URL: http://www.econ.kobe-u.ac.jp/RePEc/koe/wpaper/2014/1409.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    5. Boberg-Fazlic, Nina & Sharp, Paul & Weisdorf, Jacob, 2011. "Survival of the richest? Social status, fertility and social mobility in England 1541-1824," European Review of Economic History, Cambridge University Press, vol. 15(03), pages 365-392, December.
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    9. repec:cor:louvrp:-1676 is not listed on IDEAS
    10. David N. Weil & Oded Galor, 2000. "Population, Technology, and Growth: From Malthusian Stagnation to the Demographic Transition and Beyond," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 90(4), pages 806-828, September.
    11. Zhao Kai, 2011. "Social Security, Differential Fertility, and the Dynamics of the Earnings Distribution," The B.E. Journal of Macroeconomics, De Gruyter, vol. 11(1), pages 1-31, August.
    12. Weir, David R., 1995. "Family Income, Mortality, and Fertility on the Eve of the Demographic Transition: A Case Study of Rosny-Sous-Bois," The Journal of Economic History, Cambridge University Press, vol. 55(01), pages 1-26, March.
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