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Public Policy and the Income-Fertility Relationship in Economic Development

  • Masako Kimura

    ()

    (Nagoya City University)

  • Daishin Yasui

    ()

    (Kobe University)

In the pre-industrial era, there was a positive association between income and fertility across households within societies, but in the modern era, a clear association does not seem to exist, neither positive nor negative. Why the income-fertility relationship within societies changed over time is an unsolved puzzle in the history of economic growth, one that has been raised by Gregory Clark (e.g., A Farewell to Alms, 2007). This paper suggests that public policy for children has a key role in solving this puzzle. The interaction between changes in public policy for children and economic development generates changes in the income-fertility relationship across households, as well as hump-shaped dynamics of the average fertility rate over time.

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File URL: http://www.kier.kyoto-u.ac.jp/DP/DP834.pdf
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Paper provided by Kyoto University, Institute of Economic Research in its series KIER Working Papers with number 834.

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Length: 37pages
Date of creation: Dec 2012
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:kyo:wpaper:834
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  3. David de la Croix & Matthias Doepke, 2003. "Inequality and Growth: Why Differential Fertility Matters," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 93(4), pages 1091-1113, September.
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  8. Clark, Gregory & Cummins, Neil, 2010. "Malthus to Modernity: England’s First Fertility Transition, 1760-1800," MPRA Paper 25465, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  9. Nils-Petter Lagerlöf, 2006. "The Galor-Weil Model Revisited: A Quantitative Exercise," Review of Economic Dynamics, Elsevier for the Society for Economic Dynamics, vol. 9(1), pages 116-142, January.
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  13. Rodrigo R. Soares, 2004. "Mortality Reductions, Educational Attainment, and Fertility Choice," Econometric Society 2004 North American Winter Meetings 9, Econometric Society.
  14. Masako Kimura & Daishin Yasui, 2008. "Public Provision of Private Child Goods," KIER Working Papers 662, Kyoto University, Institute of Economic Research.
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  18. Masako Kimura & Daishin Yasui, 2010. "The Galor–Weil gender-gap model revisited: from home to market," Journal of Economic Growth, Springer, vol. 15(4), pages 323-351, December.
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