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Population Contributions to Global Income Inequality: A Fuller Account

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  • ELOUNDOU-ENYEGUE Parfait
  • TENIKUE Michel
  • KANDIWA Vongai M.

Abstract

Population processes are expected to contribute to global income inequality but so far, studies have mostly documented the contributions of changing population size. Such studies typically decompose global inequality trends into population size vs. income effects. We expand decomposition to cover population size, age structure and worker productivity, thus giving a fuller account of demographic influences. This expansion reveals a larger influence of population factors than previously recognized. Further, age structure (not population size) wields the larger influence and its acknowledgment helps consider international differences in dependency ratios. The implications and extensions of these findings are discussed

Suggested Citation

  • ELOUNDOU-ENYEGUE Parfait & TENIKUE Michel & KANDIWA Vongai M., 2013. "Population Contributions to Global Income Inequality: A Fuller Account," LISER Working Paper Series 2013-28, LISER.
  • Handle: RePEc:irs:cepswp:2013-28
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    3. Deininger, Klaus & Squire, Lyn, 1996. "A New Data Set Measuring Income Inequality," World Bank Economic Review, World Bank Group, vol. 10(3), pages 565-591, September.
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    5. Decancq, Koen & Decoster, André & Schokkaert, Erik, 2009. "The Evolution of World Inequality in Well-being," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 37(1), pages 11-25, January.
    6. Xavier Sala-i-Martin, 2006. "The World Distribution of Income: Falling Poverty and … Convergence, Period," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 121(2), pages 351-397.
    7. Xavier Sala-i-Martin, 2001. "The disturbing 'rise' of global income inequality," Economics Working Papers 616, Department of Economics and Business, Universitat Pompeu Fabra, revised Apr 2002.
    8. Zhao Kai, 2011. "Social Security, Differential Fertility, and the Dynamics of the Earnings Distribution," The B.E. Journal of Macroeconomics, De Gruyter, vol. 11(1), pages 1-31, August.
    9. Peter Svedberg, 2004. "World Income Distribution: Which Way?," Journal of Development Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 40(5), pages 1-32.
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    Keywords

    Demographic transitions; population size; age structure; decomposition; global inequality; population growth;

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