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More Schooling, More Generous? Estimating the effect of education on intergenerational transfers

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  • YIN Ting
  • ZHANG Junchao

Abstract

This paper studies the causal effect of education on intergenerational transfers from/to adult children. Using micro-data from the China Health and Retirement Longitudinal Study, we exploit exogenous variations in parents' schooling induced by China's Great Famine to take account of the endogeneity of education, and then estimate the effect of schooling on the probability of receiving/giving transfers from/to adult children. The instrumental variable estimates show that an additional year of schooling has a negative effect on the probability of receiving transfers, but a positive effect on the probability of giving transfers at old age. Our results have some policy implications on social security in aging societies.

Suggested Citation

  • YIN Ting & ZHANG Junchao, 2017. "More Schooling, More Generous? Estimating the effect of education on intergenerational transfers," Discussion papers 17074, Research Institute of Economy, Trade and Industry (RIETI).
  • Handle: RePEc:eti:dpaper:17074
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Becker, Gary S, 1974. "A Theory of Social Interactions," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 82(6), pages 1063-1093, Nov.-Dec..
    2. Huang, Wei & Zhou, Yi, 2013. "Effects of education on cognition at older ages: Evidence from China's Great Famine," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 98(C), pages 54-62.
    3. Cox, Donald & Rank, Mark R, 1992. "Inter-vivos Transfers and Intergenerational Exchange," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 74(2), pages 305-314, May.
    4. Zhu, Xi & Whalley, John & Zhao, Xiliang, 2014. "Intergenerational transfer, human capital and long-term growth in China under the one child policy," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 40(C), pages 275-283.
    5. Ayşe İmrohoroğlu & Kai Zhao, 2017. "Intergenerational Transfers and China’s Social Security Reform," Working papers 2017-18, University of Connecticut, Department of Economics.
    6. Altonji, Joseph G & Hayashi, Fumio & Kotlikoff, Laurence J, 1997. "Parental Altruism and Inter Vivos Transfers: Theory and Evidence," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, pages 1121-1166.
    7. Hiroshi Fujiu & Makoto Yano, 2008. "Altruism as a motive for intergenerational transfers," International Journal of Economic Theory, The International Society for Economic Theory, vol. 4(1), pages 95-114.
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