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Intergenerational Transfers and China’s Social Security Reform

Listed author(s):
  • Ayşe İmrohoroğlu

    (University of Southern California)

  • Kai Zhao

    (University of Connecticut)

Most of the studies examining the implications of social security reforms in China use overlapping generations models and abstract from the role of family support. How-ever, in China, family support plays a prominent role in the well-being of the elderly and often substitutes for the lack of government-provided old-age support systems. In this paper, we investigate the impact of social security reform in China in a model with two-sided altruism as well as a pure life-cycle model. We show that the quantitative implications of social security reform are very different across the two models.

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File URL: http://web2.uconn.edu/economics/working/2017-18.pdf
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Paper provided by University of Connecticut, Department of Economics in its series Working papers with number 2017-18.

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Length: 55 pages
Date of creation: Aug 2017
Handle: RePEc:uct:uconnp:2017-18
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Web page: http://www.econ.uconn.edu/

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  1. Fatih Guvenen, 2009. "An Empirical Investigation of Labor Income Processes," Review of Economic Dynamics, Elsevier for the Society for Economic Dynamics, vol. 12(1), pages 58-79, January.
  2. Tauchen, George, 1986. "Finite state markov-chain approximations to univariate and vector autoregressions," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 20(2), pages 177-181.
  3. Honge Gong & Andrew Leigh & Xin Meng, 2012. "Intergenerational Income Mobility In Urban China," Review of Income and Wealth, International Association for Research in Income and Wealth, vol. 58(3), pages 481-503, September.
  4. Henning Bohn, 2006. "Optimal Private Responses to Demographic Trends: Savings, Bequests and International Mobility," RBA Annual Conference Volume,in: Christopher Kent & Anna Park & Daniel Rees (ed.), Demography and Financial Markets Reserve Bank of Australia.
  5. Yu, Jihai & Zhu, Guozhong, 2013. "How uncertain is household income in China," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 120(1), pages 74-78.
  6. Luisa Fuster & Ayşe İmrohoroğlu & Selahattin İmrohoroğlu, 2007. "Elimination of Social Security in a Dynastic Framework," Review of Economic Studies, Oxford University Press, vol. 74(1), pages 113-145.
  7. Kai Zhao & Ayse Imrohoroglu, 2016. "The Chinese Saving Rate: Productivity, Old-Age Support, and Demographics," 2016 Meeting Papers 177, Society for Economic Dynamics.
  8. Keyu Jin & Nicolas Coeurdacier, 2013. "The One-Child Policy and Household Savings in China," 2013 Meeting Papers 790, Society for Economic Dynamics.
  9. Choukhmane, Taha & Coeurdacier, Nicolas & Jin, Keyu, 2013. "The One-Child Policy and Household Savings," CEPR Discussion Papers 9688, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  10. Laitner, John, 1992. "Random earnings differences, lifetime liquidity constraints, and altruistic intergenerational transfers," Journal of Economic Theory, Elsevier, vol. 58(2), pages 135-170, December.
  11. Luisa Fuster & Ayse Imrohoroglu & Selahattin Imrohoroglu, 2003. "A welfare analysis of social security in a dynastic framework," International Economic Review, Department of Economics, University of Pennsylvania and Osaka University Institute of Social and Economic Research Association, vol. 44(4), pages 1247-1274, November.
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