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Altruism, Incomplete Markets, and Tax Reform

  • Selo Imrohoroglu

    (USC)

  • Ayse Imrohoroglu

    (USC)

  • Luisa Fuster

    (University of Toronto)

We calibrate the model to the U.S. data and numerically characterize transition paths from the current tax system to a reformed system. All our experiments are revenue-neutral. Starting from the current tax code, we allow for transitions to reformed steady-states in which the capital income taxation or labor income taxation is eliminated, with the lost revenues replaced by a higher labor income or consumption tax. In all cases, the reformed steady-state yields significantly higher capital and consumption. When the capital income tax is replaced by a higher labor income tax, only 38.4% are in favor. Using a consumption tax instead of the labor income tax raises support for reform to 45.7%. Eliminating the capital income tax in a phased-out fashion and using the more efficient consumption tax to replace the lost revenues brings support to 71.4%.

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Paper provided by Society for Economic Dynamics in its series 2007 Meeting Papers with number 491.

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Date of creation: 2007
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Handle: RePEc:red:sed007:491
Contact details of provider: Postal: Society for Economic Dynamics Christian Zimmermann Economic Research Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis PO Box 442 St. Louis MO 63166-0442 USA
Fax: 1-314-444-8731
Web page: http://www.EconomicDynamics.org/society.htmEmail:


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