IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/
MyIDEAS: Log in (now much improved!) to save this article

Intrahousehold Allocation of Education Expenditure: The Case of Sri Lanka

  • Rozana Himaz

This article uses conventional Engel curve demand analysis, as well as a double hurdle model, to explore whether there are intrahousehold differentials in the allocation of education expenditure between boys and girls in rural Sri Lanka. Contrary to the case in most developing countries, in Sri Lanka, there was a significant bias favoring girls for 1990-91 and 1995-96 for age group categories 8-9, 14-16, and 17-19, and in 2000 for age group categories 14-16 and 17-19. Significant differences in enrollment favoring girls aged 17-19 explain part of the girl bias observed in 1990-91 and 2000-2001, but most of the bias is driven by positive expenditure given enrollment. The biases favoring girls are observed at critical stages of the schooling career in the run-up to key national exams. The 8-9 age group captures the run-up to the year 5 scholarship exams that are used to gain entry to the better-performing secondary schools. The 14-16 and 17-19 age groups capture those who read for important national-level qualifications that are vital for the job market. This article also looks at various possible explanations for the bias. (c) 2010 by The University of Chicago. All rights reserved.

If you experience problems downloading a file, check if you have the proper application to view it first. In case of further problems read the IDEAS help page. Note that these files are not on the IDEAS site. Please be patient as the files may be large.

File URL: http://dx.doi.org/10.1086/648187
File Function: link to full text
Download Restriction: Access to full text is restricted to subscribers.

As the access to this document is restricted, you may want to look for a different version under "Related research" (further below) or search for a different version of it.

Article provided by University of Chicago Press in its journal Economic Development and Cultural Change.

Volume (Year): 58 (2010)
Issue (Month): 2 (01)
Pages: 231-258

as
in new window

Handle: RePEc:ucp:ecdecc:v:58:y:2010:i:2:p:231-258
Contact details of provider: Web page: http://www.journals.uchicago.edu/EDCC/

References listed on IDEAS
Please report citation or reference errors to , or , if you are the registered author of the cited work, log in to your RePEc Author Service profile, click on "citations" and make appropriate adjustments.:

as in new window
  1. Behrman, Jere R & Wolfe, Barbara L, 1984. "The Socioeconomic Impact of Schooling in a Developing Country," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 66(2), pages 296-303, May.
  2. Allen McDowell, 2003. "From the help desk: hurdle models," Stata Journal, StataCorp LP, vol. 3(2), pages 178-184, June.
  3. Behrman, Jere R & Deolalikar, Anil B, 1993. "Unobserved Household and Community Heterogeneity and the Labor Market Impact of Schooling: A Case Study for Indonesia," Economic Development and Cultural Change, University of Chicago Press, vol. 41(3), pages 461-88, April.
  4. Heckman, James, 2013. "Sample selection bias as a specification error," Applied Econometrics, Publishing House "SINERGIA PRESS", vol. 31(3), pages 129-137.
  5. Robert Jensen, 2000. "Agricultural Volatility and Investments in Children," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 90(2), pages 399-404, May.
  6. Cragg, John G, 1971. "Some Statistical Models for Limited Dependent Variables with Application to the Demand for Durable Goods," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 39(5), pages 829-44, September.
  7. Davide Aristei & Federico Pierali & Luca Pieroni, 2007. "Cohort, Age and Time Effects in Alcohol Consumption by Italian Households: a Double-Hurdle Approach," Quaderni del Dipartimento di Economia, Finanza e Statistica 30/2007, Università di Perugia, Dipartimento Economia.
  8. Sahn, David E. & Alderman, Harold, 1988. "The effects of human capital on wages, and the determinants of labor supply in a developing country," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 29(2), pages 157-183, September.
Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

This item is not listed on Wikipedia, on a reading list or among the top items on IDEAS.

When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:ucp:ecdecc:v:58:y:2010:i:2:p:231-258. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Journals Division)

If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

If references are entirely missing, you can add them using this form.

If the full references list an item that is present in RePEc, but the system did not link to it, you can help with this form.

If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

This information is provided to you by IDEAS at the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis using RePEc data.