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Structural changes and growth regimes

Author

Listed:
  • Tommaso Ciarli

    () (University of Sussex)

  • André Lorentz

    () (Université de Strasbourg)

  • Marco Valente

    () (University of Sussex
    University of L’Aquila
    Ruhr-Universitaet Bochum
    Sant’Anna School for Advanced Studies)

  • Maria Savona

    () (University of Sussex)

Abstract

Abstract We study the relation between income distribution and growth, mediated by structural changes on the demand and supply sides. Using the results from a multi-sector growth model, we compare two growth regimes that differ in three aspects: labour relations, competition and consumption patterns. Regime one, similar to Fordism, is assumed to be relatively less unequal, more competitive and to have more homogeneous consumers than regime two, which is similar to post-Fordism. We analyse the parameters that define the two regimes to study the role of the economy’s exogenous institutional features and endogenous structural features on output growth, income distribution, and their relation. We find that regime one exhibits significantly lower inequality, higher output and productivity and lower unemployment compared to regime two, and that both institutional and structural features explain these differences. Most prominent amongst the first group are wage differences, accompanied by capital income and the distribution of bonuses to top managers. The concentration of production magnifies the effect of wage differences on income distribution and output growth, suggesting the relevance of competition norms. Amongst structural determinants, firm organisation and the structure of demand are particularly relevant. The way that final demand is distributed across sectors influences competition and overall market concentration; demand from the least wealthy classes is especially important. We show also the tight linking between institutional and structural determinants. Based on this linking, we conclude by discussing a number of policy implications that emerge from our model.

Suggested Citation

  • Tommaso Ciarli & André Lorentz & Marco Valente & Maria Savona, 2019. "Structural changes and growth regimes," Journal of Evolutionary Economics, Springer, vol. 29(1), pages 119-176, March.
  • Handle: RePEc:spr:joevec:v:29:y:2019:i:1:d:10.1007_s00191-018-0574-4
    DOI: 10.1007/s00191-018-0574-4
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    Cited by:

    1. Nuvolari, Alessandro & Russo, Emanuele, 2019. "Technical progress and structural change: a long-term view," MERIT Working Papers 022, United Nations University - Maastricht Economic and Social Research Institute on Innovation and Technology (MERIT).
    2. Tommaso Ciarli & Valentina Meliciani & Maria Savona, 2012. "Knowledge Dynamics, Structural Change And The Geography Of Business Services," Journal of Economic Surveys, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 26(3), pages 445-467, July.
    3. Tommaso Ciarli, 2012. "Structural Interactions and Long Run Growth. An Application of Experimental Design to Agent Based Models," Revue de l'OFCE, Presses de Sciences-Po, vol. 0(5), pages 295-345.
    4. Emanuele Russo & Neil Foster-McGregor & Bart Verpagen, 2019. "Characterizing growth instability: new evidence on unit roots and structural breaks in long run time series," LEM Papers Series 2019/29, Laboratory of Economics and Management (LEM), Sant'Anna School of Advanced Studies, Pisa, Italy.
    5. Hartmann, Dominik & Bezerra, Mayra & Lodolo, Beatrice & Pinheiro, Flávio L., 2019. "International trade, development traps, and the core-periphery structure of income inequality," Hohenheim Discussion Papers in Business, Economics and Social Sciences 01-2019, University of Hohenheim, Faculty of Business, Economics and Social Sciences.
    6. Giovanni Dosi & Marcelo C. Pereira & Andrea Roventini & Maria Enrica Virgillito, 2016. "The Effects of Labour Market Reforms upon Unemployment and Income Inequalities: an Agent Based Model," LEM Papers Series 2016/27, Laboratory of Economics and Management (LEM), Sant'Anna School of Advanced Studies, Pisa, Italy.
    7. repec:spr:joevec:v:29:y:2019:i:1:d:10.1007_s00191-019-00609-y is not listed on IDEAS
    8. Andre Lorentz & Tommaso Ciarli & Maria Savona & Marco Valente, 2019. "Structural Transformations and Cumulative Causation: Towards an Evolutionary Micro-foundation of the Kaldorian Growth Model," Working Papers of BETA 2019-15, Bureau d'Economie Théorique et Appliquée, UDS, Strasbourg.
    9. Dosi, Giovanni & Roventini, Andrea & Russo, Emanuele, 2019. "Endogenous growth and global divergence in a multi-country agent-based model," Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control, Elsevier, vol. 101(C), pages 101-129.
    10. Giovanni Dosi & Andrea Roventini, 2019. "More is different ... and complex! the case for agent-based macroeconomics," Journal of Evolutionary Economics, Springer, vol. 29(1), pages 1-37, March.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Structural change; Income distribution; Competition; Consumption behaviour; Technological change;

    JEL classification:

    • O41 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Growth and Aggregate Productivity - - - One, Two, and Multisector Growth Models
    • L16 - Industrial Organization - - Market Structure, Firm Strategy, and Market Performance - - - Industrial Organization and Macroeconomics; Macroeconomic Industrial Structure
    • C63 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Mathematical Methods; Programming Models; Mathematical and Simulation Modeling - - - Computational Techniques
    • O14 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Industrialization; Manufacturing and Service Industries; Choice of Technology

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