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Skills, Innovation, and Growth: An Agent-Based Policy Analysis

Author

Listed:
  • Dawid Herbert

    ()

  • Gemkow Simon

    ()

  • Harting Philipp

    ()

  • Kabus Kordian

    ()

  • Wersching Klaus

    () (Bielefeld University, P.O. Box 10 01 31, 33501 Bielefeld, Germany)

  • Neugart Michael

    () (Free University of Bozen/Bolzano, Sernesistrasse 1, 39100 Bozen/Bolzano, Italy)

Abstract

We develop an agent-based macroeconomic model featuring a distinct geographical dimension and heterogeneous workers with respect to skill types. The model, which will become part of a larger simulation platform for European policymaking (EURACE), allows us to conduct exante evaluations of a wide range of public policy measures and their interaction. In particular, we study the growth and labor market effects of various policy types that promote workers’ general skill levels. Using a calibrated model it is examined in how far effects differ if spending is uniformly spread over all regions in the economy or focused in one particular region.We find that the geographic distribution of policy measures significantly affects the effects of the policy even if total spending is kept constant. Focussing training efforts in one region is the worst policy outcome while spreading funds equally across regions generates a larger output in the long-run but not in the short-run.

Suggested Citation

  • Dawid Herbert & Gemkow Simon & Harting Philipp & Kabus Kordian & Wersching Klaus & Neugart Michael, 2008. "Skills, Innovation, and Growth: An Agent-Based Policy Analysis," Journal of Economics and Statistics (Jahrbuecher fuer Nationaloekonomie und Statistik), De Gruyter, vol. 228(2-3), pages 251-275, April.
  • Handle: RePEc:jns:jbstat:v:228:y:2008:i:2-3:p:251-275
    as

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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Cincotti, Silvano & Raberto, Marco & Teglio, Andrea, 2010. "Credit money and macroeconomic instability in the agent-based model and simulator Eurace," Economics - The Open-Access, Open-Assessment E-Journal, Kiel Institute for the World Economy (IfW), vol. 4, pages 1-32.
    2. repec:spo:wpecon:info:hdl:2441/eu4vqp9ompqllr09j0h130d0n is not listed on IDEAS
    3. Dosi, Giovanni & Pereira, Marcelo C. & Roventini, Andrea & Virgillito, Maria Enrica, 2018. "What if supply-side policies are not enough? The perverse interaction of flexibility and austerity," GLO Discussion Paper Series 168, Global Labor Organization (GLO).
    4. Pasquale Cirillo & Mauro Gallegati, 2012. "The Empirical Validation of an Agent-based Model," Eastern Economic Journal, Palgrave Macmillan;Eastern Economic Association, vol. 38(4), pages 525-547.
    5. Tommaso Ciarli & Andre Lorentz & Marco Valente & Maria Savona, 2017. "Structural Changes and Growth Regime," Working Papers of BETA 2017-19, Bureau d'Economie Théorique et Appliquée, UDS, Strasbourg.
    6. Herbert Dawid & Simon Gemkow & Philipp Harting & Michael Neugart, 2009. "On the Effects of Skill Upgrading in the Presence of Spatial Labor Market Frictions: An Agent-Based Analysis of Spatial Policy Design," Journal of Artificial Societies and Social Simulation, Journal of Artificial Societies and Social Simulation, vol. 12(4), pages 1-5.
    7. repec:eee:dyncon:v:81:y:2017:i:c:p:162-186 is not listed on IDEAS
    8. Dosi, Giovanni & Fagiolo, Giorgio & Napoletano, Mauro & Roventini, Andrea, 2013. "Income distribution, credit and fiscal policies in an agent-based Keynesian model," Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control, Elsevier, vol. 37(8), pages 1598-1625.
    9. Dosi, G. & Pereira, M.C. & Roventini, A. & Virgillito, M.E., 2017. "When more flexibility yields more fragility: The microfoundations of Keynesian aggregate unemployment," Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control, Elsevier, vol. 81(C), pages 162-186.
    10. G. Fagiolo & A. Roventini., 2009. "On the Scientific Status of Economic Policy: A Tale of Alternative Paradigms," VOPROSY ECONOMIKI, N.P. Redaktsiya zhurnala "Voprosy Economiki", vol. 6.
    11. Marcel Ausloos & Herbert Dawid & Ugo Merlone, 2014. "Spatial interactions in agent-based modeling," Papers 1405.0733, arXiv.org.
    12. Michael Neugart & Matteo G. Richiardi, 2012. "Agent-based models of the labor market," LABORatorio R. Revelli Working Papers Series 125, LABORatorio R. Revelli, Centre for Employment Studies.
    13. Dosi, Giovanni & Fagiolo, Giorgio & Roventini, Andrea, 2010. "Schumpeter meeting Keynes: A policy-friendly model of endogenous growth and business cycles," Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control, Elsevier, vol. 34(9), pages 1748-1767, September.
    14. Raberto, Marco & Teglio, Andrea & Cincotti, Silvano, 2012. "Debt, deleveraging and business cycles: An agent-based perspective," Economics - The Open-Access, Open-Assessment E-Journal, Kiel Institute for the World Economy (IfW), vol. 6, pages 1-49.
    15. Giovanni Dosi, 2012. "Economic Coordination and Dynamics: Some Elements of an Alternative "Evolutionary" Paradigm," LEM Papers Series 2012/08, Laboratory of Economics and Management (LEM), Sant'Anna School of Advanced Studies, Pisa, Italy.
    16. Herbert Dawid & Philipp Harting, 2012. "Capturing Firm Behavior in Agent-based Models of Industry Evolution and Macroeconomic Dynamics," Chapters,in: Evolution, Organization and Economic Behavior, chapter 6 Edward Elgar Publishing.
    17. Herbert Dawid & Simon Gemkow & Philipp Harting & Michael Neugart, 2012. "Labor market integration policies and the convergence of regions: the role of skills and technology diffusion," Journal of Evolutionary Economics, Springer, vol. 22(3), pages 543-562, July.
    18. Shubik, Martin & Sudderth, William D., 2015. "From General Equilibrium to Schumpeter," Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control, Elsevier, vol. 61(C), pages 269-282.
    19. Giovanni Dosi & Marcelo C. Pereira & Andrea Roventini & Maria Enrica Virgillito, 2016. "The Effects of Labour Market Reforms upon Unemployment and Income Inequalities: an Agent Based Model," LEM Papers Series 2016/27, Laboratory of Economics and Management (LEM), Sant'Anna School of Advanced Studies, Pisa, Italy.
    20. Giovanni Dosi & Giorgio Fagiolo & Mauro Napoletano & Andrea Roventini, 2012. "Economic policies with endogenous innovation and Keynesian demand management," Chapters,in: What’s Right with Macroeconomics?, chapter 5, pages 110-148 Edward Elgar Publishing.

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