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Employer Recruitment Strategies and the Labor Market Outcomes of New Hires


  • Jed Devaro


The results in this article suggest, among other things, a strong association between recruitment choices and starting wages. The theoretical framework motivating the empirical analysis is a wage-posting game in which firms make wage offers and choose recruitment strategies while recognizing a trade-off between hiring speed and match quality. Introducing this theoretical framework to the recruitment literature, I present new evidence on employers' choices of recruitment methods to answer the questions "How do employer recruitment choices vary by firm and vacancy characteristics and the skill requirements of jobs?" and "How do vacancy duration and starting wages vary with recruitment choices?"(JEL MS1) Copyright 2005, Oxford University Press.

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  • Jed Devaro, 2005. "Employer Recruitment Strategies and the Labor Market Outcomes of New Hires," Economic Inquiry, Western Economic Association International, vol. 43(2), pages 263-282, April.
  • Handle: RePEc:oup:ecinqu:v:43:y:2005:i:2:p:263-282

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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. André Lorentz & Tommaso Ciarli & Maria Savona & Marco Valente, 2016. "The effect of demand-driven structural transformations on growth and technological change," Journal of Evolutionary Economics, Springer, vol. 26(1), pages 219-246, March.
    2. Alonso, Ricardo, 2014. "Recruitment and selection in organizations," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 58673, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.
    3. Jos van Ommeren & Giovanni Russo, 2004. "Sequential or Non-sequential Recruitment?," Tinbergen Institute Discussion Papers 04-109/3, Tinbergen Institute, revised 15 Sep 2008.
    4. Blasco, Sylvie & Pertold-Gebicka, Barbara, 2013. "Employment policies, hiring practices and firm performance," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 25(C), pages 12-24.
    5. Uwe Jirjahn & Jens Mohrenweiser, 2015. "Performance Pay and Applicant Screening," Research Papers in Economics 2015-11, University of Trier, Department of Economics.
    6. Oyer, Paul & Schaefer, Scott, 2011. "Personnel Economics: Hiring and Incentives," Handbook of Labor Economics, Elsevier.
    7. Alonso, Ricardo, 2015. "Recruitment and Selection in Organizations," CEPR Discussion Papers 10662, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    8. R. Jason Faberman, 2011. "How do businesses recruit?," Business Review, Federal Reserve Bank of Philadelphia, issue Q4, pages 9-17.
    9. DeVaro, Jed, 2008. "The labor market effects of employer recruitment choice," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 52(2), pages 283-314, February.
    10. Pinoli, Sara, 2008. "Screening ex-ante or screening on-the-job? The impact of the employment contract," MPRA Paper 11429, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    11. Tommaso Ciarli, 2012. "Structural Interactions and Long Run Growth. An Application of Experimental Design to Agent Based Models," Revue de l'OFCE, Presses de Sciences-Po, vol. 0(5), pages 295-345.
    12. Michele Mosca & Francesco Pastore, 2009. "Wage Effects of Recruitment Methods: The Case of the Italian Social Service Sector," AIEL Series in Labour Economics,in: Marco Musella & Sergio Destefanis (ed.), Paid and Unpaid Labour in the Social Economy. An International Perspective, edition 1, chapter 8, pages 115-141 AIEL - Associazione Italiana Economisti del Lavoro.
    13. Jos van Ommeren & Giovanni Russo, 2014. "Firm Recruitment Behaviour: Sequential or Non-sequential Search?," Oxford Bulletin of Economics and Statistics, Department of Economics, University of Oxford, vol. 76(3), pages 432-455, June.
    14. Brencic, Vera, 2007. "Employers' search prior to exhaustion of advance notice period," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 94(2), pages 266-270, February.
    15. R. Jason Faberman, 2014. "Recruiting intensity," IZA World of Labor, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA), pages 1-21, May.
    16. Tommaso Ciarli & Andre' Lorentz & Maria Savona & Marco Valente, 2012. "The role of technology, organisation, and demand in growth and income distribution," LEM Papers Series 2012/06, Laboratory of Economics and Management (LEM), Sant'Anna School of Advanced Studies, Pisa, Italy.
    17. Pedro Gomes & Javier Fernandez-Blanco, 2013. "On the Composition Effects on the Labor Market Outcomes," 2013 Meeting Papers 561, Society for Economic Dynamics.
    18. Pinoli, Sara, 2007. "Employment Protection and Labor Productivity: Positive or Negative?," MPRA Paper 11775, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    19. Annalisa Lucarelli, 2011. "Vacancies and Hirings: Preliminary Evidence from a Survey on Italian Employers," Rivista di statistica ufficiale, ISTAT - Italian National Institute of Statistics - (Rome, ITALY), vol. 13(2-3), pages 21-53.
    20. Chi Zhou & Wansheng Tang & Ruiqing Zhao, 2017. "An uncertain search model for recruitment problem with enterprise performance," Journal of Intelligent Manufacturing, Springer, vol. 28(3), pages 695-704, March.
    21. Vera Brenčič, 2010. "Do Employers Respond to the Costs of Continued Search?," Oxford Bulletin of Economics and Statistics, Department of Economics, University of Oxford, vol. 72(2), pages 221-245, April.
    22. Egbert, Henrik & Fischer, Gundula & Bredl, Sebastian, 2009. "Advertisements or friends? Formal and informal recruitment methods in Tanzania," Discussion Papers 46, Justus Liebig University Giessen, Center for international Development and Environmental Research (ZEU).

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