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Successful Employer Search? An Empirical Analysis of Vacancy Duration Using Micro Data

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  • M. J. ANDREWS
  • S. BRADLEY
  • D. STOTT
  • R. UPWARD

Abstract

This paper provides the first estimates of the determinants of the duration of employer search in the UK. We model duration until a vacancy is either successfully filled or withdrawn from the market. The econometric techniques deal with multiple vacancies and unobserved heterogeneity (dependent risks), using flexible and parametric baseline hazards. The hazards to filling and withdrawing exhibit negative and positive duration dependence respectively, implying that the conditional probability of successful employer search decreases with duration. We also find that nonmanual vacancies are less likely to fill, consistent with there being skill shortages in the sample period. Copyright (c) The London School of Economics and Political Science 2007.

Suggested Citation

  • M. J. Andrews & S. Bradley & D. Stott & R. Upward, 2008. "Successful Employer Search? An Empirical Analysis of Vacancy Duration Using Micro Data," Economica, London School of Economics and Political Science, vol. 75(299), pages 455-480, August.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:econom:v:75:y:2008:i:299:p:455-480
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Henna Nivalainen, 2014. "Internet-Based Employer Search and Vacancy Duration: Evidence from Finland," LABOUR, CEIS, vol. 28(1), pages 112-140, March.
    2. André Lorentz & Tommaso Ciarli & Maria Savona & Marco Valente, 2016. "The effect of demand-driven structural transformations on growth and technological change," Journal of Evolutionary Economics, Springer, vol. 26(1), pages 219-246, March.
    3. Katarzyna Budnik, 2008. "Search Equilibrium with Migration: the Case of Poland," NBP Working Papers 45, Narodowy Bank Polski, Economic Research Department.
    4. repec:eee:labeco:v:50:y:2018:i:c:p:67-79 is not listed on IDEAS
    5. Vera Brenčič, 2010. "Do Employers Respond to the Costs of Continued Search?," Oxford Bulletin of Economics and Statistics, Department of Economics, University of Oxford, vol. 72(2), pages 221-245, April.
    6. Bemjamin Villena-Roldan, 2009. "Aggregate Implications of Employer Search and Recruiting Selection," 2009 Meeting Papers 97, Society for Economic Dynamics.
    7. Manant, Matthieu & Pajak, Serge & Soulié, Nicolas, 2014. "Do recruiters 'like' it? Online social networks and privacy in hiring: a pseudo-randomized experiment," MPRA Paper 56845, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    8. R. Jason Faberman & Guido Menzio, 2016. "Evidence on the Relationship between Recruiting and Starting Wage," NBER Working Papers 22915, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    9. Edward P. Lazear & Kathryn L. Shaw & Christopher T. Stanton, 2016. "Who Gets Hired? The Importance of Finding an Open Slot," NBER Working Papers 22202, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    10. Jos van Ommeren & Giovanni Russo, 2014. "Firm Recruitment Behaviour: Sequential or Non-sequential Search?," Oxford Bulletin of Economics and Statistics, Department of Economics, University of Oxford, vol. 76(3), pages 432-455, June.
    11. Tommaso Ciarli, 2012. "Structural Interactions and Long Run Growth. An Application of Experimental Design to Agent Based Models," Revue de l'OFCE, Presses de Sciences-Po, vol. 0(5), pages 295-345.
    12. Oyer, Paul & Schaefer, Scott, 2011. "Personnel Economics: Hiring and Incentives," Handbook of Labor Economics, Elsevier.
    13. Tommaso Ciarli & Andre' Lorentz & Maria Savona & Marco Valente, 2012. "The role of technology, organisation, and demand in growth and income distribution," LEM Papers Series 2012/06, Laboratory of Economics and Management (LEM), Sant'Anna School of Advanced Studies, Pisa, Italy.
    14. Markus Heckmann & Susanne Noll & Martina Rebien, 2013. "Stellenbesetzungen mit Hindernissen: Bestimmungsfaktoren für den Suchverlauf," AStA Wirtschafts- und Sozialstatistisches Archiv, Springer;Deutsche Statistische Gesellschaft - German Statistical Society, vol. 6(3), pages 105-131, March.
    15. Brenzel, Hanna & Müller, Anne, 2015. "Higher wages or lower expectations? : adjustments of German firms in the hiring process," IAB Discussion Paper 201506, Institut für Arbeitsmarkt- und Berufsforschung (IAB), Nürnberg [Institute for Employment Research, Nuremberg, Germany].
    16. Annalisa Lucarelli, 2011. "Vacancies and Hirings: Preliminary Evidence from a Survey on Italian Employers," Rivista di statistica ufficiale, ISTAT - Italian National Institute of Statistics - (Rome, ITALY), vol. 13(2-3), pages 21-53.
    17. Faberman, R. Jason & Menzio, Guido, 2018. "Evidence on the relationship between recruiting and the starting wage," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 50(C), pages 67-79.

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