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Wage posting: evidence from job ads

Author

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  • Vera Brenčič

Abstract

Recent studies of search theory examine how employers use a wage-setting mechanism - either by bargaining or through the posting of a non-negotiable wage offer in a job ad - to facilitate search. We contribute to this literature by examining wage posting in job ads in the US, the UK, and Slovenia. Despite considerable differences in the incidence of wage posting, employers in all three markets are less likely to post a wage offer when searching for skilled workers. The decision on whether or not to post a wage offer is only weakly related to the outcomes of employers' search.

Suggested Citation

  • Vera Brenčič, 2012. "Wage posting: evidence from job ads," Canadian Journal of Economics, Canadian Economics Association, vol. 45(4), pages 1529-1559, November.
  • Handle: RePEc:cje:issued:v:45:y:2012:i:4:p:1529-1559
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Brenzel, Hanna & Gartner, Hermann & Schnabel, Claus, 2014. "Wage bargaining or wage posting? Evidence from the employers' side," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 29(C), pages 41-48.
    2. Kuhn, Peter J. & Shen, Kailing, 2014. "Do Employers Prefer Undocumented Workers? Evidence from China's Hukou System," IZA Discussion Papers 8289, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    3. Peter Kuhn & Kailing Shen, 2015. "Do employers prefer migrant workers? Evidence from a Chinese job board," IZA Journal of Labor Economics, Springer;Forschungsinstitut zur Zukunft der Arbeit GmbH (IZA), vol. 4(1), pages 1-31, December.
    4. Kohei Kawamura & József Sákovics, 2014. "Spillovers of Equal Treatment in Wage Offers," Scottish Journal of Political Economy, Scottish Economic Society, vol. 61(5), pages 487-501, November.
    5. Marinescu, Ioana E. & Wolthoff, Ronald P., 2015. "Opening the Black Box of the Matching Function: The Power of Words," IZA Discussion Papers 9071, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    6. Delgado Helleseter, Miguel & Kuhn, Peter J. & Shen, Kailing, 2016. "Age and Gender Profiling in the Chinese and Mexican Labor Markets: Evidence from Four Job Boards," IZA Discussion Papers 9891, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    7. Miguel Delgado Helleseter & Peter Kuhn & Kailing Shen, 2016. "The Age Twist in Employers’ Gender Requests: Evidence from Four Job Boards," NBER Working Papers 22187, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    8. Kawamura, Kohei & Sákovics, József, 2013. "Partial Equal Treatment in Wage Offers," SIRE Discussion Papers 2013-06, Scottish Institute for Research in Economics (SIRE).
    9. Randall Wright & Philipp Kircher & Benoit Julîen & Veronica Guerrieri, 2017. "Directed Search: A Guided Tour," NBER Working Papers 23884, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • J23 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Labor Demand
    • M51 - Business Administration and Business Economics; Marketing; Accounting; Personnel Economics - - Personnel Economics - - - Firm Employment Decisions; Promotions

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