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Recruitment Methods and Vacancy Duration


  • Roper, Stephen


Data from a national (U.K.) sample of job vacancies was used to explore the factors determining job vacancy duration. Banded durational dat a necessitated the use of regression techniques which allow for a qua litative dependent variable. The chosen approach was a polychotamous ordered probit model. The choice of recruitment methods by firms was found to be highly significant. Between recruitment methods the stand ard relativities emerged; informal methods fill vacancies fastest-new spaper advertisements are slowest. Copyright 1988 by Scottish Economic Society.

Suggested Citation

  • Roper, Stephen, 1988. "Recruitment Methods and Vacancy Duration," Scottish Journal of Political Economy, Scottish Economic Society, vol. 35(1), pages 51-64, February.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:scotjp:v:35:y:1988:i:1:p:51-64

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Eytan Sheshinski & Yoram Weiss, 1977. "Inflation and Costs of Price Adjustment," Review of Economic Studies, Oxford University Press, vol. 44(2), pages 287-303.
    2. Taylor, John B., 1981. "On the relation between the variability of inflation and the average inflation rate," Carnegie-Rochester Conference Series on Public Policy, Elsevier, vol. 15(1), pages 57-85, January.
    3. Parks, Richard W, 1978. "Inflation and Relative Price Variability," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 86(1), pages 79-95, February.
    4. Granger, C W J, 1969. "Investigating Causal Relations by Econometric Models and Cross-Spectral Methods," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 37(3), pages 424-438, July.
    5. Mussa, Michael L, 1977. "The Welfare Cost of Inflation and the Role of Money as a Unit of Account," Journal of Money, Credit and Banking, Blackwell Publishing, vol. 9(2), pages 276-286, May.
    6. Tobin, James, 1972. "Inflation and Unemployment," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 62(1), pages 1-18, March.
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    Cited by:

    1. Andrea Weber & Helmut Mahringer, 2008. "Choice and success of job search methods," Empirical Economics, Springer, vol. 35(1), pages 153-178, August.
    2. Manning, Alan, 2000. " Pretty Vacant: Recruitment in Low-Wage Labour Markets," Oxford Bulletin of Economics and Statistics, Department of Economics, University of Oxford, vol. 62(0), pages 747-770, Special I.
    3. Jos van Ommeren & Giovanni Russo, 2004. "Sequential or Non-sequential Recruitment?," Tinbergen Institute Discussion Papers 04-109/3, Tinbergen Institute, revised 15 Sep 2008.
    4. Michele Pellizzari, 2010. "Do Friends and Relatives Really Help in Getting a Good Job?," ILR Review, Cornell University, ILR School, vol. 63(3), pages 494-510, April.
    5. James W. Albrecht & Jan C. van Ours, 2006. "Using Employer Hiring Behavior to Test the Educational Signaling Hypothesis," Scandinavian Journal of Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 108(3), pages 361-372, October.
    6. Miana Plesca, 2010. "A General Equilibrium Evaluation of the Employment Service," Journal of Human Capital, University of Chicago Press, vol. 4(3), pages 274-329.
    7. Ours, J.C., 1988. "Durations of dutch job vacancies," Serie Research Memoranda 0046, VU University Amsterdam, Faculty of Economics, Business Administration and Econometrics.
    8. Teyssiere, Gilles, 1995. "Matching processes in the labour market an econometric study," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 2(4), pages 421-435, December.
    9. Morissette, Rene & Zhang, Xuelin, 2001. "Quelles entreprises ont des taux de vacance eleves au Canada?," Direction des etudes analytiques : documents de recherche 2001176f, Statistics Canada, Direction des etudes analytiques.
    10. Michele Mosca & Francesco Pastore, 2009. "Wage Effects of Recruitment Methods: The Case of the Italian Social Service Sector," AIEL Series in Labour Economics,in: Marco Musella & Sergio Destefanis (ed.), Paid and Unpaid Labour in the Social Economy. An International Perspective, edition 1, chapter 8, pages 115-141 AIEL - Associazione Italiana Economisti del Lavoro.
    11. Morissette, Rene & Zhang, Xuelin, 2001. "Which Firms Have High Job Vacancy Rates in Canada?," Analytical Studies Branch Research Paper Series 2001176e, Statistics Canada, Analytical Studies Branch.
    12. Böheim, René & Taylor, Mark P., 2001. "Job search methods, intensity and success in Britain in the 1990s," ISER Working Paper Series 2001-07, Institute for Social and Economic Research.
    13. Osorno Del Rosal, Mª P. & Navarro Ibáñez, M., 2000. "Actividad y desempleo femenino: un modelo bivariante," Estudios de Economía Aplicada, Estudios de Economía Aplicada, vol. 14, pages 117-136, Abril.
    14. Osberg, Lars, 1995. "The Missing Link - Data on the Demand Side of Labour Markets," Analytical Studies Branch Research Paper Series 1995077e, Statistics Canada, Analytical Studies Branch.
    15. Markus Heckmann & Susanne Noll & Martina Rebien, 2013. "Stellenbesetzungen mit Hindernissen: Bestimmungsfaktoren für den Suchverlauf," AStA Wirtschafts- und Sozialstatistisches Archiv, Springer;Deutsche Statistische Gesellschaft - German Statistical Society, vol. 6(3), pages 105-131, March.
    16. Ours, J.C. & Ridder, G., 1989. "An empirical analysis of vacancy durations and vacancy flows : cyclical variation and job requirements," Serie Research Memoranda 0031, VU University Amsterdam, Faculty of Economics, Business Administration and Econometrics.
    17. Burdett, Kenneth & Cunningham, Elizabeth J, 1998. "Toward a Theory of Vacancies," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 16(3), pages 445-478, July.
    18. Adams, John & Greig, Malcolm & McQuaid, Ronald W., 1999. "Mismatch and unemployment in local labour markets," ERSA conference papers ersa99pa027, European Regional Science Association.
    19. Egbert, Henrik & Fischer, Gundula & Bredl, Sebastian, 2009. "Advertisements or friends? Formal and informal recruitment methods in Tanzania," Discussion Papers 46, Justus Liebig University Giessen, Center for international Development and Environmental Research (ZEU).
    20. Ours, J.C., 1989. "An empirical analysis of employers' search," Serie Research Memoranda 0021, VU University Amsterdam, Faculty of Economics, Business Administration and Econometrics.

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