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Internet-Based Employer Search and Vacancy Duration: Evidence from Finland

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  • Henna Nivalainen

Abstract

This study investigates the effect of the introduction of the public employment agency's Internet-based service on the duration of employer search. The analysis exploits the introduction of a web-based service by the Finnish Employment Agency in October 2002. The results, based on information on job vacancies announced via the public employment agency between 2002 and 2003, indicate that the introduction of the web service, in general, shortened the duration of employer search. However, we find that the introduction of the web-based service shortened the average duration of vacancies in some regions but not in others. In addition, employers in urban areas were more likely to benefit from the introduction of the online service.

Suggested Citation

  • Henna Nivalainen, 2014. "Internet-Based Employer Search and Vacancy Duration: Evidence from Finland," LABOUR, CEIS, vol. 28(1), pages 112-140, March.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:labour:v:28:y:2014:i:1:p:112-140
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    File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.1111/labr.12027
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