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Who Gets The Job And Why? An Explorative Study Of Employers’ Recruitment Behavior

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  • Lars Behrenz

    () (Växjö University)

Abstract

In the literature of labor economics we find many examples of studies analyzing job seekers search behavior, but few examples of the corresponding analysis of the recruitment behavior of employers. This paper gives a picture of the recruitment behavior of Swedish employers. The analysis is based on about 800 telephone interviews with employers regarding the last person they had hired. This paper relates the lemon’s problem in Akerlof with the Spence signaling model, and then it proceeds to relate indices and signals to the hiring behavior of employers. Employers mainly recruit personnel in order to expand a certain activity of their firm. On an average the total recruitment process takes about a month. In first round employers mainly look for job seekers with good education and experience. During the job interview the employer search for persons with professional knowledge, personal engagement and social competence.

Suggested Citation

  • Lars Behrenz, 2001. "Who Gets The Job And Why? An Explorative Study Of Employers’ Recruitment Behavior," Journal of Applied Economics, Universidad del CEMA, vol. 4, pages 255-278, November.
  • Handle: RePEc:cem:jaecon:v:4:y:2001:n:2:p:255-278
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    File URL: http://www.cema.edu.ar/publicaciones/download/volume4/behrenz.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Mohrenweiser, Jens & Wydra-Sommaggio, Gaby & Zwick, Thomas, 2014. "Adverse Selection and Information Advantages of Training Firms," Annual Conference 2014 (Hamburg): Evidence-based Economic Policy 100525, Verein für Socialpolitik / German Economic Association.
    2. Hensvik, Lena & Nordström Skans, Oskar, 2013. "Networks and youth labor market entry," Working Paper Series 2013:23, IFAU - Institute for Evaluation of Labour Market and Education Policy.
    3. Yannick Fondeur & Michèle Forté & Guillemette De Larquier & Sylvie Monchatre & Géraldine Rieucau & Marie Salognon & Ariel Sevilla & Carole Tuchszirer, 2012. "Pratiques de recrutement et sélectivité sur le marché du travail," Université Paris1 Panthéon-Sorbonne (Post-Print and Working Papers) halshs-00971684, HAL.
    4. Jorge M. Streb, 2006. "Job market signals and signs," CEMA Working Papers: Serie Documentos de Trabajo. 326, Universidad del CEMA.
    5. Michele Pellizzari, 2011. "Employers' Search and the Efficiency of Matching," British Journal of Industrial Relations, London School of Economics, vol. 49(1), pages 25-53, March.
    6. Wagner, Robert & Zwick, Thomas, 2012. "How acid are lemons? Adverse selection and signalling for skilled labour market entrants," ZEW Discussion Papers 12-014, ZEW - Zentrum für Europäische Wirtschaftsforschung / Center for European Economic Research.
    7. repec:eee:labeco:v:46:y:2017:i:c:p:118-130 is not listed on IDEAS

    More about this item

    Keywords

    labor market; recruitment behavior; vacancies;

    JEL classification:

    • J23 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Labor Demand
    • J63 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Mobility, Unemployment, Vacancies, and Immigrant Workers - - - Turnover; Vacancies; Layoffs

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