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Unemployment Duration: Competing and Defective Risks

Author

Listed:
  • John T. Addison
  • Pedro Portugal

Abstract

This paper examines the determinants of unemployment duration in the framework of a competing risks model, where the destination states are employment and inactivity. The major innovation is the use of a split-population approach to accommodate the presence of defective risks in the context of the competing risks model. Certain of the regressors that affect the conditional hazards are allowed to influence defective risks. Unobserved individual heterogeneity among the susceptible populations is also controlled for. Access to unemployment benefits and age are accorded special emphasis because of their influence on defective risks and escape rates.

Suggested Citation

  • John T. Addison & Pedro Portugal, 2000. "Unemployment Duration: Competing and Defective Risks," Working Papers w200001, Banco de Portugal, Economics and Research Department.
  • Handle: RePEc:ptu:wpaper:w200001
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    File URL: https://www.bportugal.pt/sites/default/files/anexos/papers/wp200001.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Bart L. W. Cockx, 2000. "Analysis Of Transition Data By The Minimum-Chi-Square Method: An Application To Welfare Spells In Belgium," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 79(3), pages 392-405, August.
    2. Flinn, Christopher J & Heckman, James J, 1983. "Are Unemployment and Out of the Labor Force Behaviorally Distinct Labor Force States?," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 1(1), pages 28-42, January.
    3. Pudney, Stephen & Thomas, Jonathan, 1995. "Specification Tests for the Competing Risks Duration Model: An Application to Unemployment Duration and Sectoral Movement," Oxford Bulletin of Economics and Statistics, Department of Economics, University of Oxford, vol. 57(3), pages 323-347, August.
    4. Olivier Blanchard & Pedro Portugal, 1998. "What Hides Behind an Umemployment Rate: Comparing Portuguese and U.S. Unemployment," NBER Working Papers 6636, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    5. Narendranathan, Wiji & Stewart, Mark B., 1989. "Modelling the Probability of Leaving Unemployment: Competing Risks Models with Flexible Baseline Hazards," Economic Research Papers 268365, University of Warwick - Department of Economics.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Wang, Xiaobing, 2007. "Labor market behavior of Chinese rural households during transition," Studies on the Agricultural and Food Sector in Transition Economies, Leibniz Institute of Agricultural Development in Transition Economies (IAMO), volume 42, number 92321.
    2. João Miguel Ejarque, 2009. "A Search Model with a Quasi-Network," Discussion Papers 10-23, University of Copenhagen. Department of Economics, revised Sep 2010.
    3. John T. Addison & Mário Centeno & Pedro Portugal, 2004. "Reservation Wages, Search Duration, and Accepted Wages in Europe," Working Papers w200413, Banco de Portugal, Economics and Research Department.
    4. José Arranz & Carlos García-Serrano & Luis Toharia, 2010. "The Influence of Temporary Employment on Unemployment Exits in a Competing Risks Framework," Journal of Labor Research, Springer, vol. 31(1), pages 67-90, March.

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • J64 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Mobility, Unemployment, Vacancies, and Immigrant Workers - - - Unemployment: Models, Duration, Incidence, and Job Search
    • J65 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Mobility, Unemployment, Vacancies, and Immigrant Workers - - - Unemployment Insurance; Severance Pay; Plant Closings

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