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Are Short-Lived Jobs Stepping Stones to Long-Lasting Jobs?

Author

Listed:
  • Cockx, B.
  • Picchio, M.

    (Tilburg University, Center For Economic Research)

Abstract

This paper assesses whether short-lived jobs (lasting one quarter or less and involuntarily ending in unemployment) are stepping stones to long-lasting jobs (enduring one year or more) for Belgian long-term unemployed school-leavers. We proceed in two steps. First, we estimate labour market trajectories in a multi-spell duration model that incorporates lagged duration and lagged occurrence dependence. Second, in a simulation we find that (fe)male school-leavers accepting a short-lived job are, within two years, 13.4 (9.5) percentage points more likely to find a long-lasting job than in the counterfactual in which they reject short-lived jobs.
(This abstract was borrowed from another version of this item.)

Suggested Citation

  • Cockx, B. & Picchio, M., 2010. "Are Short-Lived Jobs Stepping Stones to Long-Lasting Jobs?," Discussion Paper 2010-95, Tilburg University, Center for Economic Research.
  • Handle: RePEc:tiu:tiucen:b3133571-d38d-49aa-b7c3-42e1804ad37a
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    File URL: https://pure.uvt.nl/ws/portalfiles/portal/1261754/2010-95.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Martin Browning & Thomas F. Crossley & Eric F. Smith, 2007. "Asset Accumulation and Short Term Employment," Review of Economic Dynamics, Elsevier for the Society for Economic Dynamics, vol. 10(3), pages 400-423, July.
    2. Casquel, Elena & Cunyat, Antoni, 2008. "Temporary contracts, employment protection and skill: A simple model," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 100(3), pages 333-336, September.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    More about this item

    Keywords

    event history model; transition data; state dependence; short-lived jobs; stepping stone effect; long-lasting jobs;

    JEL classification:

    • C15 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Econometric and Statistical Methods and Methodology: General - - - Statistical Simulation Methods: General
    • C41 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Econometric and Statistical Methods: Special Topics - - - Duration Analysis; Optimal Timing Strategies
    • J62 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Mobility, Unemployment, Vacancies, and Immigrant Workers - - - Job, Occupational and Intergenerational Mobility; Promotion
    • J64 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Mobility, Unemployment, Vacancies, and Immigrant Workers - - - Unemployment: Models, Duration, Incidence, and Job Search

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