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Young people's labour market transitions: The role of early experiences

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  • Dorsett, Richard
  • Lucchino, Paolo

Abstract

We use UK longitudinal survey data to model young people's transitions between employment, unemployment, education and a residual category made up of those neither in education nor economically active. Transitions from employment are shown to exhibit negative duration dependence regardless of destination, while transitions from unemployment only do so when the destination is employment. The results suggest the nature and length of males’ preceding spells affect transitions from unemployment to employment but that this is not the case for females. The combination of modelled effects is captured through simulations. These show that, for both males and females, a period neither in education nor economically active has more damaging long-term consequences for future employment than a period of unemployment.

Suggested Citation

  • Dorsett, Richard & Lucchino, Paolo, 2018. "Young people's labour market transitions: The role of early experiences," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 54(C), pages 29-46.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:labeco:v:54:y:2018:i:c:p:29-46
    DOI: 10.1016/j.labeco.2018.06.002
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    1. Bonev, Petyo, 2020. "Nonparametric identification in nonseparable duration models with unobserved heterogeneity," Economics Working Paper Series 2005, University of St. Gallen, School of Economics and Political Science.

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Young people; Labour market transitions; Duration dependence; Lagged duration dependence; Unobserved heterogeneity;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • C33 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Multiple or Simultaneous Equation Models; Multiple Variables - - - Models with Panel Data; Spatio-temporal Models
    • C41 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Econometric and Statistical Methods: Special Topics - - - Duration Analysis; Optimal Timing Strategies
    • J64 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Mobility, Unemployment, Vacancies, and Immigrant Workers - - - Unemployment: Models, Duration, Incidence, and Job Search

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