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Vacancy Durations: Search or Selection?

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  • van Ours, J C
  • Ridder, G

Abstract

In van Ours and Ridder (1992), the authors showed that employers use a nonsequential search strategy when filling job vacancies. In this paper, they explicitly decompose a vacancy duration into an applicant period and a selection period. The authors formulate a simple theory for the determination of the application period. By making some distributional assumptions, they obtain estimates of the average application and selection period. The authors conclude that vacancy durations are devoted to selection. Copyright 1993 by Blackwell Publishing Ltd

Suggested Citation

  • van Ours, J C & Ridder, G, 1993. "Vacancy Durations: Search or Selection?," Oxford Bulletin of Economics and Statistics, Department of Economics, University of Oxford, vol. 55(2), pages 187-198, May.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:obuest:v:55:y:1993:i:2:p:187-98
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    Cited by:

    1. Manning, Alan, 2000. " Pretty Vacant: Recruitment in Low-Wage Labour Markets," Oxford Bulletin of Economics and Statistics, Department of Economics, University of Oxford, vol. 62(0), pages 747-770, Special I.
    2. Daron Acemoglu & Robert Shimer, 1999. "Efficient Unemployment Insurance," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 107(5), pages 893-928, October.
    3. Christopher A. Pissarides & Barbara Petrongolo, 2001. "Looking into the Black Box: A Survey of the Matching Function," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 39(2), pages 390-431, June.
    4. Jos van Ommeren & Giovanni Russo, 2014. "Firm Recruitment Behaviour: Sequential or Non-sequential Search?," Oxford Bulletin of Economics and Statistics, Department of Economics, University of Oxford, vol. 76(3), pages 432-455, June.
    5. Ronald Wolthoff, 2010. "Applications and Interviews: A Structural Analysis of Two-Sided Simultaneous Search," 2010 Meeting Papers 114, Society for Economic Dynamics.
    6. Pieter A. Gautier & Jose Luis Moraga-Gonzalez & Ronald P. Wolthoff, 2007. "Structural Estimation of Search Intensity: Do Non-Employed Workers Search Enough?," Tinbergen Institute Discussion Papers 07-071/3, Tinbergen Institute.
    7. Sengul, Gonul, 2017. "Effect of labor market policies on unemployment when firms adapt their recruitment strategy," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 60(C), pages 169-179.
    8. Jos van Ommeren & Giovanni Russo, 2004. "Sequential or Non-sequential Recruitment?," Tinbergen Institute Discussion Papers 04-109/3, Tinbergen Institute, revised 15 Sep 2008.
    9. Samuel Mühlemann & Mirjam Strupler Leiser, 2015. "Ten Facts You Need To Know About Hiring," Economics of Education Working Paper Series 0111, University of Zurich, Department of Business Administration (IBW), revised Sep 2015.
    10. Kuhn, Peter J. & Shen, Kailing, 2010. "Gender Discrimination in Job Ads: Theory and Evidence," IZA Discussion Papers 5195, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    11. Upward, Richard & Martyn Andrews & Steve Bradley & Dave Stott, 2003. "Testing theories of labour market matching," Royal Economic Society Annual Conference 2003 209, Royal Economic Society.
    12. Oyer, Paul & Schaefer, Scott, 2011. "Personnel Economics: Hiring and Incentives," Handbook of Labor Economics, Elsevier.
    13. James W. Albrecht & Jan C. van Ours, 2006. "Using Employer Hiring Behavior to Test the Educational Signaling Hypothesis," Scandinavian Journal of Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 108(3), pages 361-372, October.
    14. Miana Plesca, 2010. "A General Equilibrium Evaluation of the Employment Service," Journal of Human Capital, University of Chicago Press, vol. 4(3), pages 274-329.
    15. Miana Plesca, 2005. "Accounting for General Equilibrium Effects in Program Evalution," 2005 Meeting Papers 499, Society for Economic Dynamics.
    16. Peter Kuhn & Kailing Shen, 2009. "Employers' Preferences for Gender, Age, Height and Beauty: Direct Evidence," NBER Working Papers 15564, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    17. M. J. Andrews & S. Bradley & D. Stott & R. Upward, 2008. "Successful Employer Search? An Empirical Analysis of Vacancy Duration Using Micro Data," Economica, London School of Economics and Political Science, vol. 75(299), pages 455-480, August.
    18. M Andrews & S Bradley & D Stott & R Upward, 2003. "Why do Job-Seeker and Vacancy Hazards Slope Downwards? Estimating a Two-Sided Search Model of the Labour Market," The School of Economics Discussion Paper Series 0320, Economics, The University of Manchester.
    19. Tomaz Cajner & Isabel Cairo, 2011. "Human Capital and Unemployment Dynamics: Why More Educated Workers Enjoy Greater Employment Stability," 2011 Meeting Papers 1145, Society for Economic Dynamics.
    20. Pieter Gautier & Jose Luis Moraga-Gonzalez & Ronald Wolthoff, 2007. "Structural Estimation of Search Intensity: Do non-employed workers search hard enough?," 2007 Meeting Papers 695, Society for Economic Dynamics.
    21. Gregg, Paul & Petrongolo, Barbara, 2005. "Stock-flow matching and the performance of the labor market," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 49(8), pages 1987-2011, November.
    22. João Miguel Coelho, 2003. "Unemployment and Vacancy Duration in the Portuguese Labour Market," Economic Bulletin and Financial Stability Report Articles, Banco de Portugal, Economics and Research Department.
    23. repec:eee:labeco:v:46:y:2017:i:c:p:118-130 is not listed on IDEAS

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