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Job Search In A Dynamic Environment An Empirical Analysis

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  • NARENDRANATHAN, W.

Abstract

A dynamic job search model which allows us to distinguish various effects, such as 'offer' probability effects and leisure effects, on an individual's behavior is presented and estimated. We find that: (1) there is disutility from being unemployed, especially after the first three months of unemployment; (2) income receipts other than unemployment benefits and earnings have only a very small effect on the behavior; (3) the conditional probability of leaving unemployment shows no sign of decreasing with duration; (4) the elasticity of expected duration with respect to unemployment benefits in the first three months of the spell is 0.18 for teenage men, 0.13-0.14 for men aged 20-44, 0.08 for men aged 45-54, and 0.06 for men over 55, giving an overall average of 0.12; and (5) these elasticities are zero after the first three months of the spell. Copyright 1993 by Royal Economic Society.
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Suggested Citation

  • Narendranathan, W., 1989. "Job Search In A Dynamic Environment An Empirical Analysis," Papers 357, London School of Economics - Centre for Labour Economics.
  • Handle: RePEc:fth:lseple:357
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    Cited by:

    1. Rosholm, Michael & Svarer, Michael, 2004. "Estimating the Threat Effect of Active Labour Market Programmes," IZA Discussion Papers 1300, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    2. Manning, Alan, 2001. "Labour supply, search and taxes," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 80(3), pages 409-434, June.
    3. Knut Roed & Tao Zhang, 2003. "Does Unemployment Compensation Affect Unemployment Duration?," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 113(484), pages 190-206, January.
    4. Oberholzer-Gee, Felix, 2008. "Nonemployment stigma as rational herding: A field experiment," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 65(1), pages 30-40, January.
    5. Van den Berg, Gerard J., 2001. "Duration models: specification, identification and multiple durations," Handbook of Econometrics,in: J.J. Heckman & E.E. Leamer (ed.), Handbook of Econometrics, edition 1, volume 5, chapter 55, pages 3381-3460 Elsevier.
    6. M. J. Andrews & S. Bradley & D. Stott & R. Upward, 2008. "Successful Employer Search? An Empirical Analysis of Vacancy Duration Using Micro Data," Economica, London School of Economics and Political Science, vol. 75(299), pages 455-480, August.
    7. repec:eee:labchp:v:3:y:1999:i:pc:p:3085-3139 is not listed on IDEAS

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    Keywords

    job searching ; unemployment;

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