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Matching the Demand for and Supply of Training in the School-to-Work Transition

  • M. J. Andrews

    (University of Manchester)

  • S. Bradley

    (Lancaster University)

  • D. Stott

    (Lancaster University)

This empirical paper investigates skill formation in the youth labour market. Using event-history data collected from the administrative records of Lancashire Careers Service, we model "training preferences" formed at school by young people and "training destinations", ie the occupation of the first job/training scheme. We also model the duration of the individual"s first unemployment spell. Competing risks models with flexible piece-wise linear baseline hazards and unobserved heterogeneity are estimated. There is evidence of occupational segregation by gender and an excess demand for general training. Outcomes are mainly determined by examination performance, ethnicity and whether disadvantaged. Copyright Royal Economic Society 2002.

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Article provided by Royal Economic Society in its journal Economic Journal.

Volume (Year): 112 (2002)
Issue (Month): 478 (March)
Pages: C201-C219

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Handle: RePEc:ecj:econjl:v:112:y:2002:i:478:p:c201-c219
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  1. Wiji Arulampalam & Alison L. Booth, 1997. "Who gets over the training hurdle? A study of the training experiences of young men and women in Britain," Journal of Population Economics, Springer, vol. 10(2), pages 197-217.
  2. Shields, Michael, 1998. "Changes in the Determinants of Employer-Funded Training for Full-Time Employees in Britain, 1984-1994," Oxford Bulletin of Economics and Statistics, Department of Economics, University of Oxford, vol. 60(2), pages 189-214, May.
  3. Leslie, Derek & Drinkwater, Stephen, 1999. "Staying on in Full-Time Education: Reasons for Higher Participation Rates among Ethnic Minority Males and Females," Economica, London School of Economics and Political Science, vol. 66(261), pages 63-77, February.
  4. Andrews, Martyn & Bradley, Steve, 1997. "Modelling the Transition from School and the Demand for Training in the United Kingdom," Economica, London School of Economics and Political Science, vol. 64(255), pages 387-413, August.
  5. Heckman, James J. & Singer, Burton, 1984. "Econometric duration analysis," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 24(1-2), pages 63-132.
  6. Andrews, Martyn J. & Bradley, Steve & Upward, Richard, 2001. "Estimating the probability of a match using microeconomic data for the youth labour market," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 8(3), pages 335-357, June.
  7. Green, Francis, 1993. "The Determinants of Training of Male and Female Employees in Britain," Oxford Bulletin of Economics and Statistics, Department of Economics, University of Oxford, vol. 55(1), pages 103-22, February.
  8. Patricia Rice, 1999. "The impact of local labour markets on investment in further education: Evidence from the England and Wales youth cohort studies," Journal of Population Economics, Springer, vol. 12(2), pages 287-312.
  9. Han, Aaron & Hausman, Jerry A, 1990. "Flexible Parametric Estimation of Duration and Competing Risk Models," Journal of Applied Econometrics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 5(1), pages 1-28, January-M.
  10. Dolton, Peter J & Makepeace, Gerald H & Treble, John G, 1994. "The Youth Training Scheme and the School-to-Work Transition," Oxford Economic Papers, Oxford University Press, vol. 46(4), pages 629-57, October.
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