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Matching the Demand for and Supply of Training in the School-to-Work Transition

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  • M. J. Andrews

    (University of Manchester)

  • S. Bradley

    (Lancaster University)

  • D. Stott

    (Lancaster University)

Abstract

This empirical paper investigates skill formation in the youth labour market. Using event-history data collected from the administrative records of Lancashire Careers Service, we model "training preferences" formed at school by young people and "training destinations", ie the occupation of the first job/training scheme. We also model the duration of the individual"s first unemployment spell. Competing risks models with flexible piece-wise linear baseline hazards and unobserved heterogeneity are estimated. There is evidence of occupational segregation by gender and an excess demand for general training. Outcomes are mainly determined by examination performance, ethnicity and whether disadvantaged. Copyright Royal Economic Society 2002.

Suggested Citation

  • M. J. Andrews & S. Bradley & D. Stott, 2002. "Matching the Demand for and Supply of Training in the School-to-Work Transition," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 112(478), pages 201-219, March.
  • Handle: RePEc:ecj:econjl:v:112:y:2002:i:478:p:c201-c219
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Wiji Arulampalam & Alison L. Booth, 1997. "Who gets over the training hurdle? A study of the training experiences of young men and women in Britain," Journal of Population Economics, Springer;European Society for Population Economics, vol. 10(2), pages 197-217.
    2. Dolton, Peter J & Makepeace, Gerald H & Treble, John G, 1994. "The Youth Training Scheme and the School-to-Work Transition," Oxford Economic Papers, Oxford University Press, vol. 46(4), pages 629-657, October.
    3. Leslie, Derek & Drinkwater, Stephen, 1999. "Staying on in Full-Time Education: Reasons for Higher Participation Rates among Ethnic Minority Males and Females," Economica, London School of Economics and Political Science, vol. 66(261), pages 63-77, February.
    4. Patricia Rice, 1999. "The impact of local labour markets on investment in further education: Evidence from the England and Wales youth cohort studies," Journal of Population Economics, Springer;European Society for Population Economics, vol. 12(2), pages 287-312.
    5. Andrews, Martyn J. & Bradley, Steve & Upward, Richard, 2001. "Estimating the probability of a match using microeconomic data for the youth labour market," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 8(3), pages 335-357, June.
    6. Heckman, James J. & Singer, Burton, 1984. "Econometric duration analysis," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 24(1-2), pages 63-132.
    7. Andrews, Martyn & Bradley, Steve, 1997. "Modelling the Transition from School and the Demand for Training in the United Kingdom," Economica, London School of Economics and Political Science, vol. 64(255), pages 387-413, August.
    8. Shields, Michael, 1998. "Changes in the Determinants of Employer-Funded Training for Full-Time Employees in Britain, 1984-1994," Oxford Bulletin of Economics and Statistics, Department of Economics, University of Oxford, vol. 60(2), pages 189-214, May.
    9. Han, Aaron & Hausman, Jerry A, 1990. "Flexible Parametric Estimation of Duration and Competing Risk Models," Journal of Applied Econometrics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 5(1), pages 1-28, January-M.
    10. Green, Francis, 1993. "The Determinants of Training of Male and Female Employees in Britain," Oxford Bulletin of Economics and Statistics, Department of Economics, University of Oxford, vol. 55(1), pages 103-122, February.
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Anna Vignoles & Fernando Galindo-Rueda & Leon Feinstein, 2004. "The Labour Market Impact of Adult Education and Training: A Cohort Analysis," Scottish Journal of Political Economy, Scottish Economic Society, vol. 51(2), pages 266-280, May.
    2. Steve Bradley & Pam Lenton, 2007. "Dropping out of post-compulsory education in the UK: an analysis of determinants and outcomes," Journal of Population Economics, Springer;European Society for Population Economics, vol. 20(2), pages 299-328, April.
    3. Jens Mohrenweiser, 2013. "Which firms train disadvantaged youth?," Economics of Education Working Paper Series 0087, University of Zurich, Department of Business Administration (IBW).
    4. Kyyrä, Tomi, 2007. "Studies on Wage Differentials and Labour Market Transitions," Research Reports 133, VATT Institute for Economic Research.
    5. C Green, 2009. "Short Term Gain, Long Term Pain. The Effect of Informal Job Search Methods on Post-Displacement Outcomes," Working Papers 599230, Lancaster University Management School, Economics Department.
    6. S Bradley & C Green & G Leeves, 2006. "The role of pecuniary and non-pecuniary factors in teacher turnover and mobility decisions," Working Papers 579097, Lancaster University Management School, Economics Department.
    7. Tomi Kyyrä, 2009. "Marginal Effects for Competing Risks Models with Piecewise Constant Hazards," Oxford Bulletin of Economics and Statistics, Department of Economics, University of Oxford, vol. 71(4), pages 539-565, August.
    8. Colin Green, 2012. "Employed and unemployed job search methods: Australian evidence on search duration, wages and job stability," Working Papers 50029416, Lancaster University Management School, Economics Department.

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