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Which firms train disadvantaged youth?

Author

Listed:
  • Jens Mohrenweiser

    () (Zentrum für Europäische Wirtschaftsforschung Mannheim (ZEW) (Centre for European Economic Research))

Abstract

The integration of disadvantaged youth into the labour market is a challenging policy issue. Since young people gain most from work experience and learning provided by firms, hence within apprenticeships, firms play a crucial role in training disadvantaged youths. Knowing firm characteristics that moderate the selection of firms in such training schemes might help to design more effective and efficient policy measures. This paper estimates the determinants of firms that participate in a training programme for disadvantaged youth in Germany. The paper shows that firms with greater training capacity in terms of full-time instructors and own training facilities and firms willing to invest own additional resources in the training of disadvantaged youth are more likely to participate in this training scheme. On the contrary, firm size, an increasing demand for skilled workers and difficulties in finding apprentices do not influence the participation.

Suggested Citation

  • Jens Mohrenweiser, 2013. "Which firms train disadvantaged youth?," Economics of Education Working Paper Series 0087, University of Zurich, Department of Business Administration (IBW).
  • Handle: RePEc:iso:educat:0087
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    File URL: http://repec.business.uzh.ch/RePEc/iso/leadinghouse/0087_lhwpaper.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Dolton, Peter J & Makepeace, Gerald H & Treble, John G, 1994. "The Youth Training Scheme and the School-to-Work Transition," Oxford Economic Papers, Oxford University Press, vol. 46(4), pages 629-657, October.
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    3. John Van Reenen, 2004. "Active Labor Market Policies and the British New Deal for the Young Unemployed in Context," NBER Chapters,in: Seeking a Premier Economy: The Economic Effects of British Economic Reforms, 1980-2000, pages 461-496 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    4. Dorsett, Richard, 2006. "The new deal for young people: effect on the labour market status of young men," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 13(3), pages 405-422, June.
    5. Friedhelm Pfeiffer & Ruben R. Seiberlich, 2011. "Disconnected Young Adults in Germany: Initial Evidence," Schmollers Jahrbuch : Journal of Applied Social Science Studies / Zeitschrift für Wirtschafts- und Sozialwissenschaften, Duncker & Humblot, Berlin, vol. 131(2), pages 253-262.
    6. Paul Ryan, 2001. "The School-to-Work Transition: A Cross-National Perspective: Corrigendum," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 39(3), pages 767-767, September.
    7. repec:mpr:mprres:6097 is not listed on IDEAS
    8. Fries, Jan & Göbel, Christian & Maier, Michael F., 2013. "Do employment subsidies reduce early apprenticeship dropout?," ZEW Discussion Papers 13-053, ZEW - Zentrum für Europäische Wirtschaftsforschung / Center for European Economic Research.
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    10. M. J. Andrews & S. Bradley & D. Stott, 2002. "Matching the Demand for and Supply of Training in the School-to-Work Transition," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 112(478), pages 201-219, March.
    11. Niepel, Verena, 2010. "The importance of cognitive and social skills for the duration of unemployment," ZEW Discussion Papers 10-104, ZEW - Zentrum für Europäische Wirtschaftsforschung / Center for European Economic Research.
    12. Peter Z. Schochet & John Burghardt & Sheena McConnell, 2008. "Does Job Corps Work? Impact Findings from the National Job Corps Study," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 98(5), pages 1864-1886, December.
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    Cited by:

    1. Zwick Thomas & Mohrenweiser Jens, 2015. "Youth Unemployment After Apprenticeship Training and Individual, Occupation, and Training Employer Characteristics," Journal of Economics and Statistics (Jahrbuecher fuer Nationaloekonomie und Statistik), De Gruyter, vol. 235(4-5), pages 418-432, August.
    2. Mohrenweiser Jens & Pfeiffer Friedhelm, 2015. "Coaching Disadvantaged Young People: Evidence from Firm Level Data," Journal of Economics and Statistics (Jahrbuecher fuer Nationaloekonomie und Statistik), De Gruyter, vol. 235(4-5), pages 459-473, August.
    3. Uschi Backes-Gellner, 2014. "Benefits of Apprenticeship Training and Recent Challenges - Empirical Results and Lessons from Switzerland and Germany," Economics of Education Working Paper Series 0097, University of Zurich, Department of Business Administration (IBW).

    More about this item

    Keywords

    disadvantaged youth; apprenticeship; policy evaluation;

    JEL classification:

    • J24 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Human Capital; Skills; Occupational Choice; Labor Productivity
    • M53 - Business Administration and Business Economics; Marketing; Accounting; Personnel Economics - - Personnel Economics - - - Training
    • M51 - Business Administration and Business Economics; Marketing; Accounting; Personnel Economics - - Personnel Economics - - - Firm Employment Decisions; Promotions

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