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Recruitment and Apprenticeship Training

  • Jens Mohrenweiser

    ()

    (Zentrum fuer Europaeische Wirtschaftsforschung Mannheim (ZEW) (Centre for European Economic Research))

The paper assess the potential free-riding of non-training firms on the training efforts of training firms and analyses differences in recruitment of apprenticeship graduates trained elsewhere between training and non-training firms. The paper shows that only 5.6 per cent of non-training firms hire apprenticeship graduates. On the contrary, 27 per cent of training firms hire switching apprenticeship graduates. In total, 85.5 per cent of firms that hire switching apprenticeship graduates train themselves and only four per cent of all apprenticeship graduates find their first job in non-training firms. This indicates a comparative advantage of training firms in hiring apprenticeship graduates trained elsewhere.

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File URL: http://repec.business.uzh.ch/RePEc/iso/leadinghouse/0073_lhwpaper.pdf
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Paper provided by University of Zurich, Institute for Strategy and Business Economics (ISU) in its series Economics of Education Working Paper Series with number 0073.

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Length: 21 pages
Date of creation: Feb 2012
Date of revision: Aug 2013
Handle: RePEc:iso:educat:0073
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  1. Uschi Backes-Gellner & Simone Tuor, 2007. "Avoiding Labor Shortages by Employer Signaling - On the Importance of Good Work Climate and Labor Relations," Working Papers 0067, University of Zurich, Institute for Strategy and Business Economics (ISU).
  2. Rainer Winkelmann, 1996. "Employment Prospects and Skill Acquisition of Apprenticeship-Trained Workers in Germany," ILR Review, Cornell University, ILR School, vol. 49(4), pages 658-672, July.
  3. Stevens, M., 1999. "Should Firms be Required to Pay for Vocational Training?," Economics Papers 1999-w4, Economics Group, Nuffield College, University of Oxford.
  4. Daron Acemoglu & Joern-Steffen Pischke, 1998. "Beyond Becker: Training in Imperfect Labor Markets," Working papers 98-12, Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), Department of Economics.
  5. Harhoff, Dietmar & Kane, Thomas J, 1996. "Is the German Apprenticeship System a Panacea for the US Labour Market?," CEPR Discussion Papers 1311, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  6. Robert Wagner & Thomas Zwick, 2012. "How Acid are Lemons? Adverse Selection and Signalling for Skilled Labour Market Entrants," Economics of Education Working Paper Series 0071, University of Zurich, Institute for Strategy and Business Economics (ISU), revised Feb 2012.
  7. Jens Mohrenweiser & Uschi Backes-Gellner, 2010. "Apprenticeship training: for investment or substitution?," International Journal of Manpower, Emerald Group Publishing, vol. 31(5), pages 545-562, September.
  8. Stefan C. Wolter & Samuel Mühlemann & Jürg Schweri, 2006. "Why Some Firms Train Apprentices and Many Others Do Not," German Economic Review, Verein für Socialpolitik, vol. 7, pages 249-264, 08.
  9. Ben Kriechel & Samuel Muehlemann & Harald Pfeifer & Miriam Schuette, 2011. "Works councils, collective bargaining and apprenticeship training," Economics of Education Working Paper Series 0057, University of Zurich, Institute for Strategy and Business Economics (ISU).
  10. W. Smits, 2006. "The Quality of Apprenticeship Training," Education Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 14(3), pages 329-344.
  11. Paul Ryan & Howard Gospel & Paul Lewis, 2007. "Large Employers and Apprenticeship Training in Britain," British Journal of Industrial Relations, London School of Economics, vol. 45(1), pages 127-153, 03.
  12. Samuel Muehlemann & Stefan C. Wolter & Jürg Schweri & Rainer Winkelmann, 2007. "An empirical analysis of the decision to train apprentices," Economics of Education Working Paper Series 0005, University of Zurich, Institute for Strategy and Business Economics (ISU).
  13. Mohrenweiser, Jens & Zwick, Thomas, 2008. "Why Do Firms Train Apprentices? The Net Cost Puzzle Reconsidered," ZEW Discussion Papers 08-019, ZEW - Zentrum für Europäische Wirtschaftsforschung / Center for European Economic Research.
  14. Steffen Mueller, 2008. "Capital stock approximation using firm level panel data," Working Papers 038, Bavarian Graduate Program in Economics (BGPE).
  15. Regula Geel & Uschi Backes-Gellner, 2009. "Occupational Mobility Within and Between Skill Clusters: An Empirical Analysis Based on the Skill-Weights Approach," Economics of Education Working Paper Series 0047, University of Zurich, Institute for Strategy and Business Economics (ISU).
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