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Coaching Disadvantaged Young People: Evidence from Firm Level Data

Author

Listed:
  • Mohrenweiser Jens

    () (Bournemouth University, 89 Holdenhurst Road, Bournemouth BH8 8EB, United Kingdom)

  • Pfeiffer Friedhelm

    () (Centre for European Economic Research, P.O. Box 10 34 43, 68034 Mannheim, Germany, and University of Mannheim)

Abstract

In Germany, apprenticeship training firms currently face a shrinking number of qualified schoolleavers because of smaller birth cohorts and an increasing proportion of school leavers aiming for higher education. This paper investigates whether a programme that supports firms to train disadvantaged youth can reduce recruiting difficulties in apprentice training firms. Based on unique firm-level data from the metal and electronic industry in Baden-Württemberg from 2010 to 2013, we apply instrumental variable and difference-in-difference estimations and find no significant short-term causal impact of the programme.

Suggested Citation

  • Mohrenweiser Jens & Pfeiffer Friedhelm, 2015. "Coaching Disadvantaged Young People: Evidence from Firm Level Data," Journal of Economics and Statistics (Jahrbuecher fuer Nationaloekonomie und Statistik), De Gruyter, vol. 235(4-5), pages 459-473, August.
  • Handle: RePEc:jns:jbstat:v:235:y:2015:i:4-5:p:459-473
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Dolton, Peter J & Makepeace, Gerald H & Treble, John G, 1994. "The Youth Training Scheme and the School-to-Work Transition," Oxford Economic Papers, Oxford University Press, vol. 46(4), pages 629-657, October.
    2. Mohrenweiser, Jens & Zwick, Thomas, 2009. "Why do firms train apprentices? The net cost puzzle reconsidered," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 16(6), pages 631-637, December.
    3. Caliendo, Marco & Künn, Steffen & Schmidl, Ricarda, 2011. "Fighting Youth Unemployment: The Effects of Active Labor Market Policies," IZA Discussion Papers 6222, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    4. Blomeyer Dorothea & Laucht Manfred & Coneus Katja & Pfeiffer Friedhelm, 2013. "Early Life Adversity and Children’s Competence Development: Evidence from the Mannheim Study of Children at Risk," Journal of Economics and Statistics (Jahrbuecher fuer Nationaloekonomie und Statistik), De Gruyter, vol. 233(4), pages 467-485, August.
    5. James Heckman & Flavio Cunha, 2007. "The Technology of Skill Formation," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 97(2), pages 31-47, May.
    6. Wolfgang Franz & Joachim Inkmann & Winfried Pohlmeier & Volker Zimmermann, 2000. "Young and Out in Germany (On Youths? Chances of Labor Market Entrance in Germany)," NBER Chapters,in: Youth Employment and Joblessness in Advanced Countries, pages 381-426 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    7. Oswald, Yvonne & Backes-Gellner, Uschi, 2014. "Learning for a bonus: How financial incentives interact with preferences," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 118(C), pages 52-61.
    8. Dorothea Blomeyer & Katja Coneus & Manfred Laucht & Friedhelm Pfeiffer, 2009. "Initial Risk Matrix, Home Resources, Ability Development, and Children's Achievement," Journal of the European Economic Association, MIT Press, vol. 7(2-3), pages 638-648, 04-05.
    9. Möller Joachim & Umkehrer Matthias, 2015. "Are there Long-Term Earnings Scars from Youth Unemployment in Germany?," Journal of Economics and Statistics (Jahrbuecher fuer Nationaloekonomie und Statistik), De Gruyter, vol. 235(4-5), pages 474-498, August.
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    11. Felix Wenzelmann, 2012. "Ausbildungsmotive und die Zeitaufteilung der Auszubildenden im Betrieb," Journal for Labour Market Research, Springer;Institute for Employment Research/ Institut für Arbeitsmarkt- und Berufsforschung (IAB), vol. 45(2), pages 125-145, July.
    12. Eichhorst, Werner & Hinte, Holger & Rinne, Ulf, 2013. "Youth Unemployment in Europe: What to Do about It?," IZA Policy Papers 65, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    13. Fries, Jan & Göbel, Christian & Maier, Michael F., 2013. "Do employment subsidies reduce early apprenticeship dropout?," ZEW Discussion Papers 13-053, ZEW - Leibniz-Zentrum für Europäische Wirtschaftsforschung GmbH Mannheim / Leibniz Centre for European Economic Research.
    14. Mohrenweiser, Jens & Pfeiffer, Friedhelm, 2014. "Wissenschaftliche Begleitforschung zum Pilotprojekt M+E-Einstieg: Forschungsbericht," ZEW Expertises, ZEW - Zentrum für Europäische Wirtschaftsforschung / Center for European Economic Research, number 110575, June.
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    Cited by:

    1. Joachim Möller & Gerhard Bosch & Günther Schmid & Jörg Schmidt & Jörg Asmussen, 2015. "Jugendarbeitslosigkeit in Europa: Generation ohne Perspektive?," ifo Schnelldienst, ifo Institute - Leibniz Institute for Economic Research at the University of Munich, vol. 68(17), pages 03-21, September.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Disadvantaged youth; apprenticeship training; programme evaluation;

    JEL classification:

    • J11 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Demographic Trends, Macroeconomic Effects, and Forecasts
    • J24 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Human Capital; Skills; Occupational Choice; Labor Productivity
    • M51 - Business Administration and Business Economics; Marketing; Accounting; Personnel Economics - - Personnel Economics - - - Firm Employment Decisions; Promotions
    • L60 - Industrial Organization - - Industry Studies: Manufacturing - - - General

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