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Mentoring disadvantaged youths during school-to-work transition: evidence from Germany

Author

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  • Boockmann, Bernhard
  • Nielen, Sebastian

Abstract

In the German school and vocational education systems, there is a wide range of support measures during school-to-work transition. We analyze a novel program providing mentoring to low-achieving school leavers as a bridge between different stages and different institutional systems in secondary and post-secondary education. Using high-quality survey and administrative data and propensity score matching, we find some positive effects on the probability of transiting into the dual vocational education system in the intermediate run. Higher program intensity leads to larger treatment effects. Contrary to the goals of the program, however, there is only weak evidence that it accelerates transitions into vocational training immediately after leaving school.

Suggested Citation

  • Boockmann, Bernhard & Nielen, Sebastian, 2016. "Mentoring disadvantaged youths during school-to-work transition: evidence from Germany," Annual Conference 2016 (Augsburg): Demographic Change 145770, Verein für Socialpolitik / German Economic Association.
  • Handle: RePEc:zbw:vfsc16:145770
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Stefan C. Wolter & Maria Zumbuehl, 2017. "The native-migrant gap in the progression into and through upper-secondary education," Economics of Education Working Paper Series 0139, University of Zurich, Department of Business Administration (IBW).

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • J24 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Human Capital; Skills; Occupational Choice; Labor Productivity
    • I21 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - Analysis of Education
    • I28 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - Government Policy

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