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The Native-Migrant Gap in the Progression into and through Upper-Secondary Education

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  • Stefan C. Wolter
  • Maria Zumbuehl

Abstract

In this paper we follow the students that took the PISA 2012 test in Switzerland and analyze their transition into and progress in upper-secondary education. We observe a substantive difference in the rate of progress between natives and students with a migration background. One year after leaving compulsory school, the gap between the natives and migrants that are on-track - entering the second year of upper-secondary education - is 15 percentage points. Observable differences in cognitive and non-cognitive skills can explain the gap in the success rate within upper-secondary education, but cannot fully explain the difference in the transition rate into upper-secondary education. More refined analyses present results that are consistent with the hypotheses of differences in tastes, aspirations and incomplete or inaccurate information about the education system explaining the gap in the transition into post-compulsory education.

Suggested Citation

  • Stefan C. Wolter & Maria Zumbuehl, 2017. "The Native-Migrant Gap in the Progression into and through Upper-Secondary Education," CESifo Working Paper Series 6810, CESifo.
  • Handle: RePEc:ces:ceswps:_6810
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    Cited by:

    1. Zimmermann, Markus, 2019. "Explaining Gaps in Educational Transitions Between Migrant and Native School Leavers," Rationality and Competition Discussion Paper Series 156, CRC TRR 190 Rationality and Competition.
    2. Fabienne Kiener & Ann-Sophie Gnehm & Uschi Backes-Gellner, 2020. "Non-Cognitive Skills in Training Curricula and Heterogeneous Wage Returns," Economics of Education Working Paper Series 0175, University of Zurich, Department of Business Administration (IBW).
    3. Nägele, Christof & Neuenschwander, Markus P. & Rodcharoen, Patsawee, 2018. "Higher education in Switzerland: Predictors of becoming engaged in higher vocational or higher academic education - the role of workplace factors," International Journal for Research in Vocational Education and Training (IJRVET), European Research Network in Vocational Education and Training (VETNET), European Educational Research Association, vol. 5(4), pages 264-284.

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    education; migration; occupational choice;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • I24 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - Education and Inequality
    • J15 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Economics of Minorities, Races, Indigenous Peoples, and Immigrants; Non-labor Discrimination
    • J24 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Human Capital; Skills; Occupational Choice; Labor Productivity
    • J62 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Mobility, Unemployment, Vacancies, and Immigrant Workers - - - Job, Occupational and Intergenerational Mobility; Promotion
    • J71 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Labor Discrimination - - - Hiring and Firing

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