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Why Do Students Expect to Stay Longer in College? Evidence from Europe

We investigate the expected college completion time of European college students by using data from a survey of more than 3000 students in 10 countries. We explain observed excess time to graduation by paying special attention to labor market variables, such as unemployment, wage differentials and employment protection, and to the funding of tertiary education.

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Paper provided by Department of Economics, Johannes Kepler University Linz, Austria in its series Economics working papers with number 2002-10.

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Date of creation: Aug 2002
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Handle: RePEc:jku:econwp:2002_10
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  1. Lofgren, Curt & Ohlsson, Henry, 1999. "What determines when undergraduates complete their theses? Evidence from two economics departments," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 18(1), pages 79-88, February.
  2. Booth, A.L. & Satchell, S.E., 1991. "The Hazards of Doing a PhD: An Analysis of Completion and withdrawal rates of British PhDs in the 1980's," Papers 234, Australian National University - Department of Economics.
  3. Ronald G. Ehrenberg & Panagiotis G. Mavros, 1995. "Do Doctoral Students' Financial Support Patterns Affect Their Times-To-Degree and Completion Probabilities?," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 30(3), pages 581-609.
  4. Häkkinen, Iida & Uusitalo, Roope, 2003. "The Effect of a Student Aid Reform on Graduation: A Duration Analysis," Working Paper Series 2003:8, Uppsala University, Department of Economics.
  5. Bertola, Giuseppe, 1999. "Microeconomic perspectives on aggregate labor markets," Handbook of Labor Economics, in: O. Ashenfelter & D. Card (ed.), Handbook of Labor Economics, edition 1, volume 3, chapter 45, pages 2985-3028 Elsevier.
  6. Giorgio Brunello & Claudio Lucifora & Rudolf Winter-Ebmer, 2004. "The Wage Expectations of European Business and Economics Students," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 39(4).
  7. Arulampalam, Wiji & Naylor, Robin & Smith, Jeremy, 2002. "Effects of In-Class Variation and Student Rank on the Probability of Withdrawal: Cross-Section and Time-Series Analysis for UK University Students," IZA Discussion Papers 655, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
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