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Does UK Higher Education Discriminate Against Women?

  • D Leslie
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    Using a sample of 2.3 million observations on applicants to UK Higher Education institutions from 1996-2001, the paper explores whether the selection process into Higher Education is discriminatory. The answer is no discrimination, even though women are better qualified and are less likely to be offered a place. The lower tier Higher National Diploma sector is a key issue because women (excluding nursing) are less likely to undertake these courses, which are `male orientated'. The policy conclusion is that to encourage less well-qualified females to undertake Higher Education, more appropriate provision is necessary that recognizes the reality of subject gender segregation.

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    File URL: http://www.economicissues.org.uk/Files/204Leslie.pdf
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    Article provided by Economic Issues in its journal Economic Issues.

    Volume (Year): 9 (2004)
    Issue (Month): 2 (September)
    Pages: 51-68

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    Handle: RePEc:eis:articl:204leslie
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    Web page: http://www.economicissues.org.uk

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    1. Charles Brown & Mary Corcoran, 1996. "Sex-Based Differences in School Content and the Male/Female Wage Gap," NBER Working Papers 5580, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    2. Ronald Oaxaca, 1971. "Male-Female Wage Differentials in Urban Labor Markets," Working Papers 396, Princeton University, Department of Economics, Industrial Relations Section..
    3. Derek Leslie, 2003. "Using success to measure quality in British higher education: which subjects attract the best-qualified students?," Journal of the Royal Statistical Society Series A, Royal Statistical Society, vol. 166(3), pages 329-347.
    4. F. L. Jones, 1983. "On Decomposing the Wage Gap: A Critical Comment on Blinder's Method," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 18(1), pages 126-130.
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