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The Determinants of Success and Failure of Italian University Students. Evidence from administrative data

  • Carmen Aina

    ()

    (SEMEQ Department - Faculty of Economics - Università del Piemonte Orientale "Amedeo Avogadro")

We use unique administrative data from a large private Italian University to estimate whether individual characteristics before enrolment, academic performance, geographical mobility and family size may affect completion or not. Several outcomes are taken into account, namely probability of withdrawal both for voluntary or involuntary reasons, of graduating within the minimum period and with top marks. Our estimates highlight that all these dimensions drive the outcomes analysed. Especially poor high school backgrounds increases the chances of noncompletion and graduation beyond the legal length. Higher final high school marks, more academic oriented diploma, living in a small family and being commuters entail a large probability of getting a degree with top marks and within the minimum period, as well.

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Paper provided by SEMEQ Department - Faculty of Economics - University of Eastern Piedmont in its series Working Papers with number 131.

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Date of creation: 2010
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:upo:upopwp:131
Contact details of provider: Postal: Via Perrone 18, 28100 Novara
Phone: 39.0321375310
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Web page: http://semeq.unipmn.it/
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  1. Monks, James, 1997. "The impact of college timing on earnings," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 16(4), pages 419-423, October.
  2. Brodaty, Thomas & Gary-Bobo, Robert J. & Prieto, Ana, 2008. "Does Speed Signal Ability? The Impact of Grade Repetitions on Employment and Wages," CEPR Discussion Papers 6832, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
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  4. Brunello, Giorgio & Winter-Ebmer, Rudolf, 2003. "Why do students expect to stay longer in college? Evidence from Europe," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 80(2), pages 247-253, August.
  5. Giorgio Brunello & Lorenzo Cappellari, 2005. "The Labour Market Effects of Alma Mater: Evidence from Italy," CHILD Working Papers wp05_05, CHILD - Centre for Household, Income, Labour and Demographic economics - ITALY.
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  7. Siegfried, J.J. & Stock, W.A., 2000. "So You Want to Earn a PH.D. in Economics: How Long do you Think it Will Take?," Williams Project on the Economics of Higher Education DP-53, Department of Economics, Williams College.
  8. Ronald G. Ehrenberg & George Jakubson & Jeffrey Groen & Eric So & Joseph Price, 2006. "Inside the Black Box of Doctoral Education: What Program Characteristics Influence Doctoral Students' Attrition and Graduation Probabilities?," NBER Working Papers 12065, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
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  10. McNabb, Robert & Pal, Sarmistha & Sloane, Peter, 2002. "Gender Differences in Educational Attainment: The Case of University Students in England and Wales," Economica, London School of Economics and Political Science, vol. 69(275), pages 481-503, August.
  11. Geraint Johnes & Robert McNabb, 2004. "Never Give up on the Good Times: Student Attrition in the UK," Oxford Bulletin of Economics and Statistics, Department of Economics, University of Oxford, vol. 66(1), pages 23-47, 02.
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  13. Brunello, Giorgio & Rocco, Lorenzo, 2004. "Diploma No Problem: Can Private Schools Be of Lower Quality than Public Schools?," IZA Discussion Papers 1336, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  14. Petra E. Todd & Kenneth I. Wolpin, 2003. "On The Specification and Estimation of The Production Function for Cognitive Achievement," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 113(485), pages F3-F33, February.
  15. Häkkinen, Iida & Uusitalo, Roope, 2003. "The Effect of a Student Aid Reform on Graduation: A Duration Analysis," Working Paper Series 2003:8, Uppsala University, Department of Economics.
  16. G. Boero & T. Laureti & R. Naylor, 2005. "An econometric analysis of student withdrawal and progression in post-reform Italian Universities," Working Paper CRENoS 200504, Centre for North South Economic Research, University of Cagliari and Sassari, Sardinia.
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