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Time-to-Degree: Students' Abilities, University Characteristics or What Else? Evidence from Italy


  • Carmen Aina
  • Eliana Baici
  • Giorgia Casalone

    () (SEMEQ Department - Faculty of Economics - Università del Piemonte Orientale "Amedeo Avogadro")


We use a representative sample of Italian graduates drawn from the Consorzio AlmaLaurea to assess the impact of individuals and family characteristics, university inputs and the labour market on the time taken to attain a degree. Our estimates highlight that all these dimensions drive the outcome analysed. Especially a weakening labour market causes such worsening academic performance. Our results suggest the need for a comprehensive policy intervention to increase the number of students graduating within the minimum period.

Suggested Citation

  • Carmen Aina & Eliana Baici & Giorgia Casalone, 2010. "Time-to-Degree: Students' Abilities, University Characteristics or What Else? Evidence from Italy," Working Papers 130, SEMEQ Department - Faculty of Economics - University of Eastern Piedmont.
  • Handle: RePEc:upo:upopwp:130

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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Agar Brugiavini & Carlo Carraro & Matija Kovacic, 2014. "Academic Achievements: Grades versus Duration," Working Papers 2014:13, Department of Economics, University of Venice "Ca' Foscari".
    2. Ferrante, Francesco, 2014. "Assessing quality in Higher Education: some caveats," MPRA Paper 62450, University Library of Munich, Germany.

    More about this item


    Tertiary education; time taken to attain degree; labour market;

    JEL classification:

    • J24 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Human Capital; Skills; Occupational Choice; Labor Productivity
    • I23 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - Higher Education; Research Institutions


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