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The 'Bologna process' and College enrolment decisions

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  • Cappellari, Lorenzo
  • Lucifora, Claudio

Abstract

We use survey data on cohorts of high school graduates observed before and after the Italian reform of tertiary education implementing the ‘Bologna process’ to estimate the impact of the reform on the decision to go to college. We find that individuals leaving high school after the reform have a probability of going to college that is 10 percent higher compared to individuals making the choice under the old system. We show that this increase is concentrated among individuals with good high-school performance and low parental (educational) background. We interpret this result as an indication of the existence of constraints (pre-reform) -- for good students from less affluent household -- on the optimal schooling decision. For the students who would not have enrolled under the old system we also find a small negative impact of the reform on the likelihood to drop-out from university.

Suggested Citation

  • Cappellari, Lorenzo & Lucifora, Claudio, 2008. "The 'Bologna process' and College enrolment decisions," ISER Working Paper Series 2008-16, Institute for Social and Economic Research.
  • Handle: RePEc:ese:iserwp:2008-16
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    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • I23 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - Higher Education; Research Institutions
    • I28 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - Government Policy
    • J24 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Human Capital; Skills; Occupational Choice; Labor Productivity

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