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Is '3+2' Equal to 4? University Reform and Student Academic Performance in Italy

Author

Listed:
  • Massimiliano BRATTI

    () (Universit… di Milano, DEAS)

  • Chiara BROCCOLINI

    () (Universita' Politecnica delle Marche, Dipartimento di Economia)

  • Stefano STAFFOLANI

    () (Universita' Politecnica delle Marche, Dipartimento di Economia)

Abstract

In 2001 a '3+2' (unitary two-tier) university system was introduced in Italy where a 3-year First Level degree followed by a 2-year Second Level degree replaced a one-tier system where the 'old' degree (Laurea) duration varied between a minimum of four (e.g. economics) and a maximum of six years. In this paper we use individual-level data on graduates from the Economics Faculty of the Marche Polytechnic University to investigate some effects of this reform. In particular, we seek an answer to questions such as: Did the reform induce a change in the behaviour of students and higher education institutions (e.g. course workload, grade inflation, etc.)? Did it produce a change in student academic performance (e.g. student progression, grades)? Although our paper features a case study and evidence from the Marche Polytechnic University, it cannot be straightforwardly generalised to the whole Italian University system. Our analysis is nonetheless informative given the general lack of evaluation of the '3+2' Italian university reform using micro-level data.

Suggested Citation

  • Massimiliano BRATTI & Chiara BROCCOLINI & Stefano STAFFOLANI, 2006. "Is '3+2' Equal to 4? University Reform and Student Academic Performance in Italy," Working Papers 251, Universita' Politecnica delle Marche (I), Dipartimento di Scienze Economiche e Sociali.
  • Handle: RePEc:anc:wpaper:251
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. John DiNardo & Justin L. Tobias, 2001. "Nonparametric Density and Regression Estimation," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 15(4), pages 11-28, Fall.
    2. Marco Caliendo & Sabine Kopeinig, 2008. "Some Practical Guidance For The Implementation Of Propensity Score Matching," Journal of Economic Surveys, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 22(1), pages 31-72, February.
    3. G. Boero & T. Laureti & R. Naylor, 2005. "An econometric analysis of student withdrawal and progression in post-reform Italian Universities," Working Paper CRENoS 200504, Centre for North South Economic Research, University of Cagliari and Sassari, Sardinia.
    4. Michael Spence, 1973. "Job Market Signaling," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 87(3), pages 355-374.
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Giorgio Pietro, 2013. "Military conscription and university enrolment: evidence from Italy," Journal of Population Economics, Springer;European Society for Population Economics, vol. 26(2), pages 619-644, April.
    2. Ugo FRATESI, 2010. "The National and International Effects;of Regional Policy Choices: Agglomeration Economies, Peripherality and Territorial Characteristics," Working Papers 344, Universita' Politecnica delle Marche (I), Dipartimento di Scienze Economiche e Sociali.
    3. Marialuisa Restaino, 2008. "Dropping out of University of Salerno: a survival approach," Working Papers 3_193, Dipartimento di Scienze Economiche e Statistiche, Università degli Studi di Salerno.
    4. Luca RICCETTI, 2010. "Minimum Tracking Error Volatility," Working Papers 340, Universita' Politecnica delle Marche (I), Dipartimento di Scienze Economiche e Sociali.
    5. Massimiliano BRATTI & Chiara BROCCOLINI & Stefano STAFFOLANI, 2007. "Mass Tertiary Education, Higher Education Standard and University Reform: A Theoretical Analysis," Working Papers 277, Universita' Politecnica delle Marche (I), Dipartimento di Scienze Economiche e Sociali.
    6. Lorenzo Cappellari & Claudio Lucifora & Dario Pozzoli, 2012. "Determinants of grades in maths for students in economics," Education Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 20(1), pages 1-17, February.
    7. Lucia Rizzica, 2013. "Home or away? Gender differences in the effects of an expansion of tertiary education supply," Questioni di Economia e Finanza (Occasional Papers) 181, Bank of Italy, Economic Research and International Relations Area.
    8. Cappellari, Lorenzo & Lucifora, Claudio, 2009. "The "Bologna Process" and college enrollment decisions," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 16(6), pages 638-647, December.
    9. Lerche, Katharina, 2016. "The effect of the Bologna Process on the duration of studies," Center for European, Governance and Economic Development Research Discussion Papers 287, University of Goettingen, Department of Economics.
    10. Effrosyni Adamopoulou & Giulia Martina Tanzi, 2014. "Academic performance and the Great Recession," Temi di discussione (Economic working papers) 970, Bank of Italy, Economic Research and International Relations Area.
    11. Fabio Berton & Daniele Bondonio, 2014. "The Impact of Degree Duration on Higher Education Participation: Evidence from a Large-Scale Natural Experiment," LABORatorio R. Revelli Working Papers Series 137, LABORatorio R. Revelli, Centre for Employment Studies.
    12. Fabio FIORILLO & Agnese SACCHI, 2010. "I Want to Free-ride. An Opportunistic View on Decentralization Versus Centralization Problem," Working Papers 346, Universita' Politecnica delle Marche (I), Dipartimento di Scienze Economiche e Sociali.
    13. Triventi, Moris, 2014. "Does working during higher education affect students’ academic progression?," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 41(C), pages 1-13.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    italy; propensity score matching; reform; university;

    JEL classification:

    • C14 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Econometric and Statistical Methods and Methodology: General - - - Semiparametric and Nonparametric Methods: General
    • I21 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - Analysis of Education

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