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Determinants of Grades in Maths for Students in Economics

  • Cappellari, Lorenzo

    ()

    (Catholic University of Milan)

  • Lucifora, Claudio

    ()

    (Catholic University of Milan)

  • Pozzoli, Dario

    ()

    (Department of Economics, Aarhus School of Business)

This paper investigates the determinants of grades achieved in mathematics by rst-year students in Economics. We use individual administrative data from 1993 to 2005 to t an educational production function. Our main ndings suggest that good secondary school achievements and the type of school attended are signi cantly associated with maths grades. Ceteris paribus, females typically do better than males. Since students can postpone the exam or repeat it when they fail, we also analyze the determinants of the elapsed time to pass the exam using survival analysis. Modeling simultaneously maths grades and the hazard of passing the exam, we nd that the overall hazard rate of passing the exam is higher for those students who get the higher grades. The longer students wait to take the exam, the less likely they are to obtain high grades

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File URL: http://www.hha.dk/nat/wper/09-17_dpozzoli.pdf
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Paper provided by University of Aarhus, Aarhus School of Business, Department of Economics in its series Working Papers with number 09-17.

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Length: 46 pages
Date of creation: 01 Jan 2009
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:hhs:aareco:2009_017
Contact details of provider: Postal: The Aarhus School of Business, Prismet, Silkeborgvej 2, DK 8000 Aarhus C, Denmark
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