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Student time allocation and educational production functions

Author

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  • Massimiliano Bratti

    (University of Ancona)

  • Stefano Staffolani

    (University of Ancona)

Abstract

In this paper we aim to remedy some shortcomings in the economic literature on university student absenteeism and academic performance. We start by introducing a simple theoretical model in which students decide the optimal allocation of their time between lecture attendance, self-study and leisure. Under some specific assumptions, we find a positive relationship between lecture attendance and time devoted to self-study in each course, from which we infer that estimates of student performance regressions which omit self-study might be biased. Thus, we estimate an academic performance regression using data from first year undergraduate students of economics in the academic year 1998-99 at the University of Ancona (Italy) and find evidence that once self-study time is controlled for, the positive and significant effect of lecture attendance for some courses disappears. This is likely to be important especially when student performance regressions are used to evaluate the effectiveness of course attendance and to inform the debate on the introduction of mandatory attendance on some courses to enhance student performance.

Suggested Citation

  • Massimiliano Bratti & Stefano Staffolani, 2002. "Student time allocation and educational production functions," HEW 0207001, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  • Handle: RePEc:wpa:wuwphe:0207001
    Note: Type of Document - Acrobat PDF; prepared on PC; pages: 31 ; figures: included
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Barbara Grave, 2011. "The effect of student time allocation on academic achievement," Education Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 19(3), pages 291-310.
    2. Beattie, Graham & Laliberté, Jean-William P. & Michaud-Leclerc, Catherine & Oreopoulos, Philip, 2019. "What sets college thrivers and divers apart? A contrast in study habits, attitudes, and mental health," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 178(C), pages 50-53.
    3. Luca Stanca, 2006. "The Effects of Attendance on Academic Performance: Panel Data Evidence for Introductory Microeconomics," The Journal of Economic Education, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 37(3), pages 251-266, July.
    4. repec:zbw:rwirep:0235 is not listed on IDEAS
    5. Mushay A. Ogundipe & Olufemi A. Falade, 2014. "Student-Teacher Perception of Time Allocation and Academic Achievement in Tai Solarin University of Education," International Journal of Learning and Development, Macrothink Institute, vol. 4(1), pages 65-70, March.
    6. Chadi, Adrian & de Pinto, Marco & Schultze, Gabriel, 2019. "Young, gifted and lazy? The role of ability and labor market prospects in student effort decisions," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 72(C), pages 66-79.
    7. Stefania BUSSOLETTI & Roberto ESPOSTI, 2004. "Regional Convergence, Structural Funds and the Role of Agricolture in the EU. A Panel-Data Approach," Working Papers 220, Universita' Politecnica delle Marche (I), Dipartimento di Scienze Economiche e Sociali.
    8. Marcello MESSORI & Alberto ZAZZARO, 2004. "Monetary profits within the circuit: Ponzi finance oer "mors tua, vita mea"?," Working Papers 200, Universita' Politecnica delle Marche (I), Dipartimento di Scienze Economiche e Sociali.
    9. Gervas Huxley & Mike Peacey, 2014. "An Economic Model of Learning Styles," The Centre for Market and Public Organisation 14/319, The Centre for Market and Public Organisation, University of Bristol, UK.
    10. Elvio MATTIOLI, 2003. "The measurement of coherence in the evaluation of criteria and its effects or ranking problems illustrated using a multicriteria decision method," Working Papers 199, Universita' Politecnica delle Marche (I), Dipartimento di Scienze Economiche e Sociali.
    11. repec:bri:cmpowp:13/319 is not listed on IDEAS
    12. D´Addazio, Rosaria & Andrietti, Vincenzo & Velasco, Carlos, 2008. "Class Attendance and Academic Performance among Spanish Economics Students," UC3M Working papers. Economics we096138, Universidad Carlos III de Madrid. Departamento de Economía.
    13. Roberto ESPOSTI & Pierpaolo PIERANI, 2005. "Price, Private Demand and Optimal Provision of Public R&D in Italian Agriculture," Working Papers 238, Universita' Politecnica delle Marche (I), Dipartimento di Scienze Economiche e Sociali.
    14. Ugo Fratesi, 2003. "Innovation Diffusion and the Evolution of Regional Disparities," ERSA conference papers ersa03p327, European Regional Science Association.
    15. Lorenzo Cappellari & Claudio Lucifora & Dario Pozzoli, 2012. "Determinants of grades in maths for students in economics," Education Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 20(1), pages 1-17, February.
    16. Barbara S. Grave, 2010. "The Effect of Student Time Allocation on Academic Achievement," Ruhr Economic Papers 0235, Rheinisch-Westfälisches Institut für Wirtschaftsforschung, Ruhr-Universität Bochum, Universität Dortmund, Universität Duisburg-Essen.
    17. Gervas Huxley & Mike Peacey, 2014. "A Simple Model of Learning Styles," The Centre for Market and Public Organisation 14/322, The Centre for Market and Public Organisation, University of Bristol, UK.
    18. Tobias Wolbring & Edgar Treischl, 2016. "Selection Bias in Students’ Evaluation of Teaching," Research in Higher Education, Springer;Association for Institutional Research, vol. 57(1), pages 51-71, February.
    19. Renato BALDUCCI, 2005. "Public Expenditure and Economic Growth. A critical extension of Barro's (1990) model," Working Papers 240, Universita' Politecnica delle Marche (I), Dipartimento di Scienze Economiche e Sociali.
    20. Dobkin, Carlos & Gil, Ricard & Marion, Justin, 2010. "Skipping class in college and exam performance: Evidence from a regression discontinuity classroom experiment," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 29(4), pages 566-575, August.
    21. Mehmet F. Dicle & John Levendis, 2013. "Using RFID Technology to Track Attendance," Journal for Economic Educators, Middle Tennessee State University, Business and Economic Research Center, vol. 13(1), pages 29-38, Fall.
    22. Nicola MATTEUCCI & Alessandro STERLACCHINI, 2003. "ICT and Employment Growth in Italian Industries," Working Papers 193, Universita' Politecnica delle Marche (I), Dipartimento di Scienze Economiche e Sociali.
    23. repec:bri:cmpowp:13/322 is not listed on IDEAS
    24. Gabriele Lombardi & Giulio Ghellini, 2019. "Linking University Harshness and Students’ Choices: Sociodemographic Differences based on Italian Universities’ Characteristics," Department of Economics University of Siena 805, Department of Economics, University of Siena.
    25. Pedro Gomis-Porqueras & Juergen Meinecke & Jose A. Rodrigues-Neto, 2011. "New Technologies in Higher Education: Lower Attendance and Worse Learning Outcomes?," Agenda - A Journal of Policy Analysis and Reform, Australian National University, College of Business and Economics, School of Economics, vol. 18(1), pages 69-84.

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    course attendance; student performance; time allocation;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • I21 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - Analysis of Education

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