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Class Attendance and Academic Performance among Spanish Economics Students

  • Vincenzo Andrietti
  • Rosario D'Addazio
  • Carlos Velasco

This paper presents new evidence on the effects of class attendance on academic performance. We analyse survey data collected for an Introductory Econometrics Course at the Facultad de Ciencias Sociales y Jurídicas of Universidad Carlos III de Madrid, matched to administrative data. Using OLS-proxy regressions to control for unobservable student characteristics potentially correlated with attendance, we find a positive and significant effect of attendance on academic performance. However, the fact that instrumental variable regressions may be failing to account for the correlation not captured by the controls calls for further investigation based on panel data.

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File URL: http://e-archivo.uc3m.es/bitstream/10016/5230/1/09-61-38.pdf
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Paper provided by Universidad Carlos III, Departamento de Economía in its series Economics Working Papers with number we096138.

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Date of creation: Oct 2008
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:cte:werepe:we096138
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  1. Massimiliano BRATTI & Stefano STAFFOLANI, 2002. "Student Time Allocation and Educational Production Functions," Working Papers 170, Universita' Politecnica delle Marche (I), Dipartimento di Scienze Economiche e Sociali.
  2. Schmidt, Robert M, 1983. "Who Maximizes What? A Study in Student Time Allocation," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 73(2), pages 23-28, May.
  3. Dennis Coates, 2003. "Education production functions using instructional time as an input," Education Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 11(3), pages 273-292.
  4. Edward P. Lazear, 2001. "Educational Production," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, MIT Press, vol. 116(3), pages 777-803, August.
  5. Durden, Garey C & Ellis, Larry V, 1995. "The Effects of Attendance on Student Learning in Principles of Economics," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 85(2), pages 343-46, May.
  6. David Romer, 1993. "Do Students Go to Class? Should They?," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 7(3), pages 167-174, Summer.
  7. Stephen Devadoss & John Foltz, 1996. "Evaluation of Factors Influencing Student Class Attendance and Performance," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 78(3), pages 499-507.
  8. Petra E. Todd & Kenneth I. Wolpin, 2003. "On The Specification and Estimation of The Production Function for Cognitive Achievement," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 113(485), pages F3-F33, February.
  9. Daniel R. Marburger, 2001. "Absenteeism and Undergraduate Exam Performance," The Journal of Economic Education, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 32(2), pages 99-109, January.
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