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Class attendance and learning outcome

Author

Listed:
  • Do Won Kwak

    (Korea University)

  • Carl Sherwood

    (University of Queensland)

  • Kam Ki Tang

    (University of Queensland)

Abstract

This paper presents new evidence on the dynamic treatment effects of class attendance on academic performance. The analysis is based on a dataset from a large introductory statistics course and a dynamic modeling framework of Ding and Lehrer (Rev Econ Stat 92(1):31–42, 2010). The course had seven progressive assessments spread across a thirteen-week semester. Assessment test scores were matched to individual student attendance records. We use a panel dataset to study the dynamic interactions over time and between learning activities including lectures and tutorials, while accounting for reverse causality and self-selection without resorting to instruments for attendance or discontinuity design. Class attendance is found to have a test score return rate of 1.3 percentage points per lecture and 1 percentage point per tutorial. For both lecture and tutorial attendances, the contemporaneous effect dominates the lagged effect, with the effects accumulating over time. We also find a substitution rather than complementarity effect between lecture attendance and tutorial attendance, but the former has a stronger effect on test scores than the latter. Our results also show these effects are stronger for under-performing students.

Suggested Citation

  • Do Won Kwak & Carl Sherwood & Kam Ki Tang, 2019. "Class attendance and learning outcome," Empirical Economics, Springer, vol. 57(1), pages 177-203, July.
  • Handle: RePEc:spr:empeco:v:57:y:2019:i:1:d:10.1007_s00181-018-1434-7
    DOI: 10.1007/s00181-018-1434-7
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    Cited by:

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Student performance; Class attendance; Panel data; Reverse causality; Self-selection;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • I20 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - General
    • I23 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - Higher Education; Research Institutions
    • C23 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Single Equation Models; Single Variables - - - Models with Panel Data; Spatio-temporal Models

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