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The Effects of Attendance on Academic Performance: Panel Data Evidence for Introductory Microeconomics

Author

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  • Luca Stanca

Abstract

This paper presents new evidence on the effects of attendance on academic performance. We exploit a large panel data set for Introductory Microeconomics students to explicitly take into account the effect of unobservable factors correlated with attendance, such as ability, effort and motivation. We find that neither proxy variables nor instrumental variables provide a viable solution to the omitted variable bias. Panel estimators indicate that attendance has a positive and significant impact on performance. Lecture and classes have a similar effect on performance individually, although their impact cannot be identified separately. Overall, the results indicate that, after controlling for unobservable student characteristics, teaching has an important independent effect on learning.

Suggested Citation

  • Luca Stanca, 2013. "The Effects of Attendance on Academic Performance: Panel Data Evidence for Introductory Microeconomics," Working Papers 78, University of Milano-Bicocca, Department of Economics, revised Nov 2013.
  • Handle: RePEc:mib:wpaper:78
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    File URL: http://dems.unimib.it/repec/pdf/mibwpaper78.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Ann Kirby & Brendan McElroy, 2003. "The Effect of Attendance on Grade for First Year Economics Students in University College Cork," The Economic and Social Review, Economic and Social Studies, vol. 34(3), pages 311-326.
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    5. Daniel R. Marburger, 2001. "Absenteeism and Undergraduate Exam Performance," The Journal of Economic Education, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 32(2), pages 99-109, January.
    6. Massimiliano Bratti & Stefano Staffolani, 2013. "Student Time Allocation and Educational Production Functions," Annals of Economics and Statistics, GENES, issue 111-112, pages 103-140.
    7. Petra E. Todd & Kenneth I. Wolpin, 2003. "On The Specification and Estimation of The Production Function for Cognitive Achievement," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 113(485), pages 3-33, February.
    8. Dolton, Peter & Marcenaro, Oscar D. & Navarro, Lucia, 2003. "The effective use of student time: a stochastic frontier production function case study," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 22(6), pages 547-560, December.
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    10. Durden, Garey C & Ellis, Larry V, 1995. "The Effects of Attendance on Student Learning in Principles of Economics," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 85(2), pages 343-346, May.
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    Cited by:

    1. Aucejo, Esteban & Romano, Teresa, 2014. "Assessing the effect of school days and absenceson test score performance," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 60498, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.
    2. C F Chen & K T Soo, 2009. "Some university students are more equal than others: Evidence from England," Working Papers 600480, Lancaster University Management School, Economics Department.
    3. repec:bla:ecinqu:v:55:y:2017:i:4:p:1966-1985 is not listed on IDEAS
    4. Arulampalam, Wiji & Naylor, Robin A. & Smith, Jeremy, 2012. "Am I missing something? The effects of absence from class on student performance," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 31(4), pages 363-375.
    5. Ann L. Owen, 2011. "Student Characteristics, Behavior, and Performance in Economics Classes," Chapters,in: International Handbook on Teaching and Learning Economics, chapter 32 Edward Elgar Publishing.
    6. Leonard c. Smith, 2009. "An Analysis Of The Impact Of Pedagogic Interventions In First-Year Academic Development And Mainstream Courses In Microeconomics," South African Journal of Economics, Economic Society of South Africa, vol. 77(1), pages 162-178, March.
    7. Pm Horn & Ai Jansen, 2009. "An Investigation Into The Impact Of Tutorials On The Performance Of Economics Students," South African Journal of Economics, Economic Society of South Africa, vol. 77(1), pages 179-189, March.
    8. Jennjou Chen & Tsui-Fang Lin, 2008. "Does Downloading PowerPoint Slides Before the Lecture Lead to Better Student Achievement?," International Review of Economic Education, Economics Network, University of Bristol, vol. 7(2), pages 9-18.
    9. Martins, Pedro S. & Walker, Ian, 2006. "Student Achievement and University Classes: Effects of Attendance, Size, Peers, and Teachers," IZA Discussion Papers 2490, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    10. Adam M. Lavecchia & Heidi Liu & Philip Oreopoulos, 2014. "Behavioral Economics of Education: Progress and Possibilities," NBER Working Papers 20609, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    11. Wayne A Grove x & Stephen Wu, 2011. "Factors Influencing Student Performance in Economics: Class and Instructor Characteristics," Chapters,in: International Handbook on Teaching and Learning Economics, chapter 33 Edward Elgar Publishing.
    12. Spencer, Nekeisha & Polachek, Solomon & Strobl, Eric, 2016. "How Do Hurricanes Impact Achievement in School? A Caribbean Perspective," IZA Discussion Papers 10169, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    13. Ehsan Latif & Stan Miles, 2013. "Class Attendance and Academic Performance: A Panel Data Analysis," Economic Papers, The Economic Society of Australia, vol. 32(4), pages 470-476, December.
    14. Alexandr Akimov & Sonja Kobinger & Mirela Malin, 2017. "Determinants of student success in finance courses," Discussion Papers in Finance finance:201701, Griffith University, Department of Accounting, Finance and Economics.
    15. Mehmet F. Dicle & John Levendis, 2013. "Using RFID Technology to Track Attendance," Journal for Economic Educators, Middle Tennessee State University, Business and Economic Research Center, vol. 13(1), pages 29-38, Fall.
    16. Tsui-Fang Lin & Jennjou Chen, 2006. "Cumulative class attendance and exam performance," Applied Economics Letters, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 13(14), pages 937-942.
    17. Hoffmann, Anna-Lena & Lerche, Katharina, 2016. "Class attendance and university performance," Center for European, Governance and Economic Development Research Discussion Papers 286, University of Goettingen, Department of Economics.
    18. K T Soo, 2009. "Estimating the production function of university students," Working Papers 600466, Lancaster University Management School, Economics Department.
    19. Franz Buscha & Anna Conte, 2014. "The Impact of Truancy on Educational Attainment during Compulsory Schooling: a Bivariate Ordered Probit Estimator with Mixed Effects," Manchester School, University of Manchester, vol. 82(1), pages 103-127, January.
    20. Aucejo, Esteban M. & Romano, Teresa Foy, 2016. "Assessing the effect of school days and absences on test score performance," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 55(C), pages 70-87.

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • A22 - General Economics and Teaching - - Economic Education and Teaching of Economics - - - Undergraduate
    • I21 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - Analysis of Education

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