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Education production functions using instructional time as an input

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  • Dennis Coates

Abstract

This paper contributes to the literature on the effectiveness of schools. The analysis is unique in using data on the minutes of instruction per day in each of four subjects taught in the public elementary schools in Illinois. Few education production function papers have information on the amount of instruction students receive in a given subject. The results generally indicate that time spent in mathematics and English instruction pays off in terms of improved mathematics and reading test scores. There is evidence that time spent in social studies instruction raises reading and writing scores. Additionally, the data span 3 years so that individual school-specific fixed effects are estimated and found to be strongly significant. Inclusion of these fixed effects has dramatic consequences for the parameter estimates on several variables, in some cases raising and in others reducing the estimated parameter values.

Suggested Citation

  • Dennis Coates, 2003. "Education production functions using instructional time as an input," Education Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 11(3), pages 273-292.
  • Handle: RePEc:taf:edecon:v:11:y:2003:i:3:p:273-292
    DOI: 10.1080/0964529032000148809
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. D. Mark Anderson & Mary Beth Walker, 2015. "Does Shortening the School Week Impact Student Performance? Evidence from the Four-Day School Week," Education Finance and Policy, MIT Press, vol. 10(3), pages 314-349, July.
    2. Steven G. Rivkin & Jeffrey C. Schiman, 2015. "Instruction Time, Classroom Quality, and Academic Achievement," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 125(588), pages 425-448, November.
    3. Velasco Gómez, Carlos & D´Addazio, Rosaria & Andrietti, Vincenzo, 2008. "Class Attendance and Academic Performance among Spanish Economics Students," UC3M Working papers. Economics we096138, Universidad Carlos III de Madrid. Departamento de Economía.
    4. Philipp Mandel & Bernd Süssmuth, 2011. "Total Instructional Time Exposure and Student Achievement: An Extreme Bounds Analysis Based on German State-Level Variation," CESifo Working Paper Series 3580, CESifo Group Munich.
    5. World Bank, 2011. "Accountability in Public Services in South Africa," World Bank Other Operational Studies 29723, The World Bank.
    6. Luca Stanca, 2006. "The Effects of Attendance on Academic Performance: Panel Data Evidence for Introductory Microeconomics," The Journal of Economic Education, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 37(3), pages 251-266, July.

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