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Schooling resources, educational institutions and student performance: The international evidence

  • Wößmann, Ludger

This paper estimates the effects of family background, resources and institutions on mathematics and science performance using an international database of more than 260,000 students from 39 countries which includes extensive background information at the student, teacher, school and system level. The student-level estimations show that international differences in student performance cannot be attributed to resource differences but are considerably related to institutional differences. Among the many institutions which combine to yield major positive effects on student performance are centralized examinations and control mechanisms, school autonomy in personnel and process decisions, individual teacher influence over teaching methods, limits to teacher unions’ influence on curriculum scope, scrutiny of students’ achievement and competition from private schools.

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Paper provided by University of Munich, Department of Economics in its series Munich Reprints in Economics with number 19661.

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Date of creation: 2003
Date of revision:
Publication status: Published in Oxford Bulletin of Economics and Statistics 2 65(2003): pp. 117-170
Handle: RePEc:lmu:muenar:19661
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Web page: http://www.vwl.uni-muenchen.de

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  1. Joshua D. Angrist & Victor Lavy, 1999. "Using Maimonides' Rule To Estimate The Effect Of Class Size On Scholastic Achievement," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, MIT Press, vol. 114(2), pages 533-575, May.
  2. Boissiere, M & Knight, J B & Sabot, R H, 1985. "Earnings, Schooling, Ability, and Cognitive Skills," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 75(5), pages 1016-30, December.
  3. Bishop, John Hillman, 1989. "Is the Test Score Decline Responsible for the Productivity Growth Decline?," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 79(1), pages 178-97, March.
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