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It's not all about parents' education, it also matters what they do. Parents' employment and children's school success in Germany

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  • Hoffmann, Malte
  • Boll, Christina

Abstract

In this paper, we use GSOEP data to explore whether parents employment has an extra effect on the school achievement of their children, beyond the well-established effects of education, income and demography. First, we test whether the source of income or parents unemployment determine children s school achievements. Second, we analyze the effect of job prestige and factors of societal engagement on children s performance. Our results indicate no clear income associations but the existence of an employment channel as well as a social channel from mothers to their kids. A negative role model for girls is found for maternal housework. Moreover, the fathers job prestige is substantial.

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  • Hoffmann, Malte & Boll, Christina, 2015. "It's not all about parents' education, it also matters what they do. Parents' employment and children's school success in Germany," VfS Annual Conference 2015 (Muenster): Economic Development - Theory and Policy 112933, Verein für Socialpolitik / German Economic Association.
  • Handle: RePEc:zbw:vfsc15:112933
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    Cited by:

    1. Emanuela Ghignoni, 2015. "Family background and university dropouts during the crisis: the case of Italy," Working Papers in Public Economics 169, University of Rome La Sapienza, Department of Economics and Law.
    2. Boockmann, Bernhard & Nielen, Sebastian, 2016. "Mentoring disadvantaged youths during school-to-work transition: evidence from Germany," VfS Annual Conference 2016 (Augsburg): Demographic Change 145770, Verein für Socialpolitik / German Economic Association.

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    JEL classification:

    • D13 - Microeconomics - - Household Behavior - - - Household Production and Intrahouse Allocation
    • J62 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Mobility, Unemployment, Vacancies, and Immigrant Workers - - - Job, Occupational and Intergenerational Mobility; Promotion
    • J22 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Time Allocation and Labor Supply

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