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Parents' Incomes and Children's Outcomes: A Quasi-experiment Using Transfer Payments from Casino Profits

Author

Listed:
  • Randall K. Q. Akee
  • William E. Copeland
  • Gordon Keeler
  • Adrian Angold
  • E. Jane Costello

Abstract

We examine the role an exogenous increase in household income, due to a government transfer unrelated to household characteristics, plays in children's long-run outcomes. Children in affected households have higher levels of education in their young adulthood and a lower incidence of criminality for minor offenses. Effects differ by initial household poverty status. An additional $4,000 per year for the poorest households increases educational attainment by one year at age 21, and reduces the chances of committing a minor crime by 22 percent for 16 and 17 year olds. Our evidence suggests improved parental quality is a likely mechanism for the change. (JEL D14, H23, I32, I38, J13)

Suggested Citation

  • Randall K. Q. Akee & William E. Copeland & Gordon Keeler & Adrian Angold & E. Jane Costello, 2010. "Parents' Incomes and Children's Outcomes: A Quasi-experiment Using Transfer Payments from Casino Profits," American Economic Journal: Applied Economics, American Economic Association, vol. 2(1), pages 86-115, January.
  • Handle: RePEc:aea:aejapp:v:2:y:2010:i:1:p:86-115
    Note: DOI: 10.1257/app.2.1.86
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Fredrik Andersson & John C. Haltiwanger & Mark J. Kutzbach & Giordano Palloni & Henry O. Pollakowski & Daniel H. Weinberg, 2013. "Childhood Housing and Adult Earnings: A Between-Siblings Analysis of Housing Vouchers and Public Housing," Working Papers 13-48rr, Center for Economic Studies, U.S. Census Bureau.
    2. Michio Naoi & Hideo Akabayashi & Ryosuke Nakamura & Kayo Nozaki & Shinpei Sano & Wataru Senoh & Chizuru Shikishima, 2017. "Causal Effects of Family Income on Child Outcomes and Educational Spending: Evidence from a Child Allowance Policy Reform in Japan," Keio-IES Discussion Paper Series 2017-026, Institute for Economics Studies, Keio University.
    3. Michael Clemens & Erwin Tiongson, 2012. "Split Decisions: Family finance when a policy discontinuity allocates overseas work," CReAM Discussion Paper Series 1234, Centre for Research and Analysis of Migration (CReAM), Department of Economics, University College London.
    4. Brian Jacob & Max Kapustin & Jens Ludwig, 2014. "Human Capital Effects of Anti-Poverty Programs: Evidence from a Randomized Housing Voucher Lottery," NBER Working Papers 20164, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    5. Randi Hjalmarsson & Matthew J. Lindquist, 2012. "Like Godfather, Like Son: Exploring the Intergenerational Nature of Crime," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 47(2), pages 550-582.
    6. Gelber, Alexander & Isen, Adam, 2013. "Children's schooling and parents' behavior: Evidence from the Head Start Impact Study," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 101(C), pages 25-38.
    7. Boll, Christina & Hoffmann, Malte, 2015. "It's not all about parents' education, it also matters what they do: Parents' employment and children's school success in Germany," HWWI Research Papers 162, Hamburg Institute of International Economics (HWWI).
    8. repec:spr:demogr:v:54:y:2017:i:5:d:10.1007_s13524-017-0600-4 is not listed on IDEAS
    9. Alexander Gelber & Matthew Weinzierl, 2012. "Equalizing Outcomes vs. Equalizing Opportunities: Optimal Taxation when Children's Abilities Depend on Parents' Resources," Harvard Business School Working Papers 13-014, Harvard Business School, revised Mar 2014.
    10. Hjalmarsson, Randi & Lindquist, Matthew J., 2013. "The origins of intergenerational associations in crime: Lessons from Swedish adoption data," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 20(C), pages 68-81.
    11. Carro, Jesús M. & Albarrán, Pedro & Carrasco Perea, Raquel, 2015. "Estimation of Dynamic Nonlinear Random Effects Models with Unbalanced Panels," UC3M Working papers. Economics we1503, Universidad Carlos III de Madrid. Departamento de Economía.
    12. Mazza, Julia Rachel S.E. & Lambert, Jean & Zunzunegui, Maria Victoria & Tremblay, Richard E. & Boivin, Michel & Côté, Sylvana M., 2017. "Early adolescence behavior problems and timing of poverty during childhood: A comparison of lifecourse models," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 177(C), pages 35-42.
    13. Karin Hederos Eriksson & Randi Hjalmarsson & Matthew J. Lindquist & Anna Sandberg, 2016. "The importance of family background and neighborhood effects as determinants of crime," Journal of Population Economics, Springer;European Society for Population Economics, vol. 29(1), pages 219-262, January.
    14. Lundberg, Shelly & Pollak, Robert, 2013. "Cohabitation and the Uneven Retreat from Marriage in the U.S., 1950-2010," IZA Discussion Papers 7607, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    15. Emma Tominey, 2010. "The Timing of Parental Income and Child Outcomes: The Role of Permanent and Transitory Shocks," Discussion Papers 10/21, Department of Economics, University of York.
    16. Eva Deuchert & Christina Felfe, 2013. "The Tempest: Natural Disasters, Early Shocks and Children's Short- and Long-Run Development," CESifo Working Paper Series 4168, CESifo Group Munich.
    17. Gennetian, Lisa A. & Castells, Nina & Morris, Pamela A., 2010. "Meeting the basic needs of children: Does income matter?," Children and Youth Services Review, Elsevier, vol. 32(9), pages 1138-1148, September.
    18. Ugo Colombino, 2015. "Five Crossroads on the Way to Basic Income. An Italian Tour," Italian Economic Journal: A Continuation of Rivista Italiana degli Economisti and Giornale degli Economisti, Springer;Società Italiana degli Economisti (Italian Economic Association), vol. 1(3), pages 353-389, November.
    19. Randall K. Q. Akee & Katherine A. Spilde & Jonathan B. Taylor, 2015. "The Indian Gaming Regulatory Act and Its Effects on American Indian Economic Development," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 29(3), pages 185-208, Summer.
    20. Ioana Marinescu, 2018. "No Strings Attached: The Behavioral Effects of U.S. Unconditional Cash Transfer Programs," NBER Working Papers 24337, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    21. Katz, Benjamin & Chaffin, Josh & Alon, Inbal & Ager, Alastair, 2014. "Livelihoods, economic strengthening, child protection and well-being in Western Uganda," Children and Youth Services Review, Elsevier, vol. 47(P2), pages 149-156.
    22. Björklund, Anders & Jäntti, Markus, 2012. "How important is family background for labor-economic outcomes?," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 19(4), pages 465-474.
    23. Corman, Hope & Dave, Dhaval & Kalil, Ariel & Reichman, Nancy E., 2017. "Effects of maternal work incentives on youth crime," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 49(C), pages 128-144.
    24. repec:eee:deveco:v:130:y:2018:i:c:p:17-32 is not listed on IDEAS
    25. Buckles, Kasey, 2017. "Maternal Socio-Economic Status and the Well-Being of the Next Generation(s)," IZA Discussion Papers 10714, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • D14 - Microeconomics - - Household Behavior - - - Household Saving; Personal Finance
    • H23 - Public Economics - - Taxation, Subsidies, and Revenue - - - Externalities; Redistributive Effects; Environmental Taxes and Subsidies
    • I32 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Welfare, Well-Being, and Poverty - - - Measurement and Analysis of Poverty
    • I38 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Welfare, Well-Being, and Poverty - - - Government Programs; Provision and Effects of Welfare Programs
    • J13 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Fertility; Family Planning; Child Care; Children; Youth

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