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The Impact of Local Labor Market Conditions on the Demand for Education: Evidence from Indian Casinos


  • William Evans
  • Wooyoung Kim


Using restricted-use data from the 1990 and 2000 Census long-form, we analyze the impact of local labor market conditions on the demand for education using the economic shock produced by the opening of a new casino on an Indian reservation as the identifying event. Federal legislation in 1988 allowed Indian tribes to open casinos in many states and since then, over 400 casinos have opened, 240 of which have Las Vegas-style games. We demonstrate that the opening of a casino increased the employment and wages of low-skilled workers. Young adults responded by dropping out of high school and reducing college enrollment rates, even though many tribes have generous college tuition subsidy programs.

Suggested Citation

  • William Evans & Wooyoung Kim, 2006. "The Impact of Local Labor Market Conditions on the Demand for Education: Evidence from Indian Casinos," Working Papers 06-14, Center for Economic Studies, U.S. Census Bureau.
  • Handle: RePEc:cen:wpaper:06-14

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Pedro Carneiro & James J. Heckman, 2002. "The Evidence on Credit Constraints in Post--secondary Schooling," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 112(482), pages 705-734, October.
    2. Hilary Williamson Hoynes, 2000. "Local Labor Markets And Welfare Spells: Do Demand Conditions Matter?," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 82(3), pages 351-368, August.
    3. Rees, Daniel I. & Mocan, H. Naci, 1997. "Labor market conditions and the high school dropout rate: Evidence from New York State," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 16(2), pages 103-109, April.
    4. Sandra E. Black & Amir Sufi, 2002. "Who Goes to College? Differential Enrollment by Race and Family Background," NBER Working Papers 9310, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    5. William N. Evans & Julie H. Topoleski, 2002. "The Social and Economic Impact of Native American Casinos," NBER Working Papers 9198, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
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    1. repec:eee:deveco:v:130:y:2018:i:c:p:17-32 is not listed on IDEAS
    2. Randall K. Q. Akee & Katherine A. Spilde & Jonathan B. Taylor, 2015. "The Indian Gaming Regulatory Act and Its Effects on American Indian Economic Development," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 29(3), pages 185-208, Summer.

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