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Labor market conditions and the high school dropout rate: Evidence from New York State

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  • Rees, Daniel I.
  • Mocan, H. Naci

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  • Rees, Daniel I. & Mocan, H. Naci, 1997. "Labor market conditions and the high school dropout rate: Evidence from New York State," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 16(2), pages 103-109, April.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:ecoedu:v:16:y:1997:i:2:p:103-109
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Mocan, H Naci & Topyan, Kudret, 1993. "Real Wages over the Business Cycle: Evidence from a Structural Time Series Model," Oxford Bulletin of Economics and Statistics, Department of Economics, University of Oxford, vol. 55(4), pages 363-389, November.
    2. Ehrenberg, Ronald G. & Brewer, Dominic J., 1994. "Do school and teacher characteristics matter? Evidence from High School and Beyond," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 13(1), pages 1-17, March.
    3. Keane, Michael & Moffitt, Robert & Runkle, David, 1988. "Real Wages over the Business Cycle: Estimating the Impact of Heterogeneity with Micro Data," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 96(6), pages 1232-1266, December.
    4. Beverly Duncan, 1965. "Dropouts and the Unemployed," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 73, pages 121-121.
    5. Neftci, Salih N, 1978. "A Time-Series Analysis of the Real Wages-Employment Relationship," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 86(2), pages 281-291, April.
    6. Zwerling, H. & Thomason, T., 1992. "The Effects of Teacher Unions and Collective Bargaining Laws on Educational Performance," Papers 1992-4, Queen's at Kingston - Sch. of Indus. Relat. Papers in Industrial Relations.
    7. Robert Kominski, 1990. "Estimating the National High School Dropout Rate," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 27(2), pages 303-311, May.
    8. Charles Brown, 1980. "Equalizing Differences in the Labor Market," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 94(1), pages 113-134.
    9. Summers, Anita A & Wolfe, Barbara L, 1977. "Do Schools Make a Difference?," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 67(4), pages 639-652, September.
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