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Labor market conditions and the high school dropout rate: Evidence from New York State


  • Rees, Daniel I.
  • Mocan, H. Naci


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  • Rees, Daniel I. & Mocan, H. Naci, 1997. "Labor market conditions and the high school dropout rate: Evidence from New York State," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 16(2), pages 103-109, April.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:ecoedu:v:16:y:1997:i:2:p:103-109

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Mocan, H Naci & Topyan, Kudret, 1993. "Real Wages over the Business Cycle: Evidence from a Structural Time Series Model," Oxford Bulletin of Economics and Statistics, Department of Economics, University of Oxford, vol. 55(4), pages 363-389, November.
    2. Zwerling, H. & Thomason, T., 1992. "The Effects of Teacher Unions and Collective Bargaining Laws on Educational Performance," Papers 1992-4, Queen's at Kingston - Sch. of Indus. Relat. Papers in Industrial Relations.
    3. Ehrenberg, Ronald G. & Brewer, Dominic J., 1994. "Do school and teacher characteristics matter? Evidence from High School and Beyond," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 13(1), pages 1-17, March.
    4. Robert Kominski, 1990. "Estimating the National High School Dropout Rate," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 27(2), pages 303-311, May.
    5. Keane, Michael & Moffitt, Robert & Runkle, David, 1988. "Real Wages over the Business Cycle: Estimating the Impact of Heterogeneity with Micro Data," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 96(6), pages 1232-1266, December.
    6. Beverly Duncan, 1965. "Dropouts and the Unemployed," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 73, pages 121-121.
    7. Neftci, Salih N, 1978. "A Time-Series Analysis of the Real Wages-Employment Relationship," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 86(2), pages 281-291, April.
    8. Charles Brown, 1980. "Equalizing Differences in the Labor Market," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 94(1), pages 113-134.
    9. Summers, Anita A & Wolfe, Barbara L, 1977. "Do Schools Make a Difference?," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 67(4), pages 639-652, September.
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    Cited by:

    1. Fairlie, Robert W., 2005. "The effects of home computers on school enrollment," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 24(5), pages 533-547, October.
    2. G Di Pietro, 2005. "On Migration and Unemployment: Evidence from Italian Graduates," Economic Issues Journal Articles, Economic Issues, vol. 10(2), pages 11-28, September.
    3. Paola Bertolini & Michele Lalla & Francesco Pagliacci, 2015. "School enrolment of first- and second-generation immigrant students in Italy: A geographical analysis," Papers in Regional Science, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 94(1), pages 141-159, March.
    4. Kristine Simson, 2015. "Explaining upper secondary school dropout: new evidence on the role of local labor markets," Empirical Economics, Springer, vol. 48(4), pages 1419-1444, June.
    5. Zaharieva Anna, 2014. "On-the-Job Search and Optimal Schooling under Uncertainty and Irreversibility," Politica economica, Società editrice il Mulino, issue 2-3, pages 299-339.
    6. Baert, Stijn & Neyt, Brecht & Omey, Eddy & Verhaest, Dieter, 2017. "Student Work, Educational Achievement, and Later Employment: A Dynamic Approach," IZA Discussion Papers 11127, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    7. Patrick Reilly, 2016. "Bank Branching Deregulation and High School Graduation," Working Papers 16-29, Department of Economics, West Virginia University.
    8. Juan Guio & Álvaro Choi & Josep-Oriol Escardíbul, 2016. "Labor markets, academic performance and the risk of school dropout: evidence for Spain," Working Papers 2016/9, Institut d'Economia de Barcelona (IEB).
    9. Giorgio Di Pietro, 2006. "Regional labour market conditions and university dropout rates: Evidence from Italy," Regional Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 40(6), pages 617-630.
    10. Gregory B. Upton, 2016. "The Effects of Merit-Based Scholarships on Educational Outcomes," Journal of Labor Research, Springer, vol. 37(2), pages 235-261, June.
    11. Rossella Iraci Capuccinello & Steve Bradley, 2014. "The effect of college mergers on student dropout behaviour," Working Papers 64907218, Lancaster University Management School, Economics Department.
    12. Stijn Baert & Olivier Rotsaert & Dieter Verhaest & Eddy Omey, 2016. "Student Employment and Later Labour Market Success: No Evidence for Higher Employment Chances," Kyklos, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 69(3), pages 401-425, August.
    13. Greenland, Andrew & Lopresti, John, 2016. "Import exposure and human capital adjustment: Evidence from the U.S," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 100(C), pages 50-60.
    14. Gerhard Toews & Alexander Libman, 2017. "Getting Incentives Right: Human Capital Investment and Natural Resource Booms," Working Papers 370, Leibniz Institut für Ost- und Südosteuropaforschung (Institute for East and Southeast European Studies).
    15. Steven Bradley & Giuseppe Migali, 2017. "The Effects of the 2006 Tuition Fee Reform and the Great Recession on University Student Dropout Behaviour in the UK," Working Papers 149346773, Lancaster University Management School, Economics Department.
    16. Baert, Stijn & Rotsaert, Olivier & Verhaest, Dieter & Omey, Eddy, 2015. "A Signal of Diligence? Student Work Experience and Later Employment Chances," IZA Discussion Papers 9170, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    17. Rossella Iraci Capuccinello, 2014. "Determinants and timing of dropping out decisions: evidence from the UK FE sector," Working Papers 15742191, Lancaster University Management School, Economics Department.
    18. Whitaker, Stephan, 2011. "The impact of legalized abortion on high school graduation through selection and composition," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 30(2), pages 228-246, April.
    19. William Evans & Wooyoung Kim, 2006. "The Impact of Local Labor Market Conditions on the Demand for Education: Evidence from Indian Casinos," Working Papers 06-14, Center for Economic Studies, U.S. Census Bureau.
    20. Carlos Peraita & Margarita Pastor, 2000. "The Primary School Dropout in Spain: The Influence of Family Background and Labor Market Conditions," Education Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 8(2), pages 157-168.

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