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The Primary School Dropout in Spain: The Influence of Family Background and Labor Market Conditions

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  • Carlos Peraita
  • Margarita Pastor

Abstract

The most outstanding event in the Spanish education system in the past two decades has been the overall improvement of enrolment in all educational levels. However, the primary school dropout rate in Spain is relatively high, and the evidence indicates that being a dropout is a permanent condition. This is the first study on dropouts in Spain, and it uses individual-level data from the Living and Working Conditions Survey (1985) to analyze the determinants of dropping out of primary school in Spain. This paper focuses on the impact of family socio-economic background and labour market conditions on dropping out. The results from logistic regression for dropping out are consistent with earlier literature. Specifically, they indicate that family socio-economic status variables are significant factors in determining the probability of dropping out, and the youth labour market conditions also have an impact on primary school dropout behaviour. Finally, some policy recommendations are discussed.

Suggested Citation

  • Carlos Peraita & Margarita Pastor, 2000. "The Primary School Dropout in Spain: The Influence of Family Background and Labor Market Conditions," Education Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 8(2), pages 157-168.
  • Handle: RePEc:taf:edecon:v:8:y:2000:i:2:p:157-168
    DOI: 10.1080/096452900410721
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Rees, Daniel I. & Mocan, H. Naci, 1997. "Labor market conditions and the high school dropout rate: Evidence from New York State," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 16(2), pages 103-109, April.
    2. Ehrenberg, Ronald G. & Brewer, Dominic J., 1994. "Do school and teacher characteristics matter? Evidence from High School and Beyond," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 13(1), pages 1-17, March.
    3. Richard J. Murnane & John B. Willett & Kathryn Parker Boudett, 1997. "Does Acquisition of a GED Lead to More Training, Post-Secondary Education, and Military Service for School Dropouts?," NBER Working Papers 5992, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    4. Card, David & Krueger, Alan B, 1992. "Does School Quality Matter? Returns to Education and the Characteristics of Public Schools in the United States," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 100(1), pages 1-40, February.
    5. Eide, Eric R. & Showalter, Mark H., 2001. "The effect of grade retention on educational and labor market outcomes," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 20(6), pages 563-576, December.
    6. Chuang, Hwei-Lin, 1997. "High school youths' dropout and re-enrollment behavior," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 16(2), pages 171-186, April.
    7. Randall J. Olsen & George Farkas, 1989. "Endogenous Covariates in Duration Models and the Effect of Adolescent Childbirth on Schooling," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 24(1), pages 39-53.
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    Cited by:

    1. Pedro Manuel Rodríguez Suárez & Elvio Accinelli Gamba, 2008. "Regionalismo económico en América del Norte: ¿hacia la comunidad de América del Norte?," Documentos de Trabajo (working papers) 1708, Department of Economics - dECON.
    2. Rossana Patrón, 2008. "Early school dropouts in developing countries: An integer approach to guide intervention. The case of Uruguay," Documentos de Trabajo (working papers) 1608, Department of Economics - dECON.

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