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Do birth order and family size matter for intergenerational income mobility? Evidence from Sweden

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  • Lena Lindahl

Abstract

Previous studies of intergenerational income mobility have not considered potential birth-order or family-size effects in the estimated income elasticity. This article uses a large sample of individuals born between 1962 and 1964; income elasticities with respect to parents' incomes are estimated for individuals with different birth-order positions and family sizes. Results based on labour income and total income for sons and daughters are reported separately. The elasticity tends to decrease with family size as well as with birth order for a given family size, especially in the labour-income analysis of fathers and sons.

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  • Lena Lindahl, 2008. "Do birth order and family size matter for intergenerational income mobility? Evidence from Sweden," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 40(17), pages 2239-2257.
  • Handle: RePEc:taf:applec:v:40:y:2008:i:17:p:2239-2257
    DOI: 10.1080/00036840600949421
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    2. Aso, Hiroki, 2020. "Differential Fertility, Intergenerational Mobility and the Process of Economic Development," MPRA Paper 99429, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    3. Ea Hoppe Blaabæk & Mads Meier Jæger & Joseph Molitoris, 2020. "Family Size and Educational Attainment: Cousins, Contexts, and Compensation," European Journal of Population, Springer;European Association for Population Studies, vol. 36(3), pages 575-600, July.
    4. Arnaud Lefranc & Alain Trannoy, 2005. "Intergenerational earnings mobility in France: Is France more mobile than the U.S.?," Annals of Economics and Statistics, GENES, issue 78, pages 57-77.
    5. Boll, Christina & Hoffmann, Malte, 2015. "It's not all about parents' education, it also matters what they do: Parents' employment and children's school success in Germany," HWWI Research Papers 162, Hamburg Institute of International Economics (HWWI).
    6. Brian Nolan & Gosta Esping-Andersen & Christopher T. Whelan & Bertrand Maitre, 2010. "The Role of Social Institutions in Inter-Generational Mobility," Working Papers 201018, Geary Institute, University College Dublin.
    7. Björklund Anders & Lindahl Lena & Lindquist Matthew J., 2010. "What More Than Parental Income, Education and Occupation? An Exploration of What Swedish Siblings Get from Their Parents," The B.E. Journal of Economic Analysis & Policy, De Gruyter, vol. 10(1), pages 1-40, November.
    8. Espen Bratberg & Øivind Anti Nilsen & Kjell Vaage, 2012. "Is Recipiency of Disability Pension Hereditary?," CESifo Working Paper Series 3796, CESifo.
    9. Arnaud Lefranc & Alain Trannoy, 2005. "Intergenerational Earnings Mobility in France: Is France More Mobile than the US?," Post-Print hal-01651123, HAL.
    10. Blaess, Virginie, 2005. "Siblings and Educational Attainment in West Germany," Discussion Papers 2005,001E, University of Erfurt, Faculty of Economics, Law and Social Sciences.
    11. Abdel Abdellaoui & Oana Borcan & Pierre Chiappori & David Hugh-Jones, 2022. "Trading Social Status for Genetics in Marriage Markets: Evidence from UK Biobank," University of East Anglia School of Economics Working Paper Series 2022-04, School of Economics, University of East Anglia, Norwich, UK..
    12. Henrekson, Magnus & Lyssarides, Odd & Ottosson, Jan, 2016. "The Social Background of Elite Executives: The Swedish Case," Working Paper Series 1138, Research Institute of Industrial Economics, revised 12 Jul 2021.
    13. repec:pra:mprapa:106108 is not listed on IDEAS
    14. Holmlund, Helena, 2006. "Intergenerational Mobility and Assortative Mating. Effects of an Educational Reform," Working Paper Series 4/2006, Stockholm University, Swedish Institute for Social Research.
    15. Aso, Hiroki, 2020. "Differential Fertility, Intergenerational Mobility and the Process of Economic Development," MPRA Paper 106148, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    16. Anna Christina D'Addio, 2007. "Intergenerational Transmission of Disadvantage: Mobility or Immobility Across Generations?," OECD Social, Employment and Migration Working Papers 52, OECD Publishing.
    17. Corak, Miles, 2006. "Do Poor Children Become Poor Adults? Lessons from a Cross Country Comparison of Generational Earnings Mobility," IZA Discussion Papers 1993, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).

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    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • J12 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Marriage; Marital Dissolution; Family Structure
    • J62 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Mobility, Unemployment, Vacancies, and Immigrant Workers - - - Job, Occupational and Intergenerational Mobility; Promotion

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