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Intergenerational earnings mobility in France : Is France more mobile than the US ?

  • Arnaud Lefranc

    ()

    (THEMA, Université de Cergy-Pontoise)

  • Alain Trannoy

    ()

    (EHESS, GREQAM-IDEP)

This paper examines the extent and evolution of intergenerational earnings mobility in France. We use data from five waves of the French Education-Training-Employment (FQP) surveys covering the period 1964 to 1993. Our estimation procedure follows Björklund and Jäntti (1997)’s two-sample instrumental variable method. On our samples, the elasticity of son’s (respectively daughter’s) long-run income with respect to father’s long run income is around.4 (resp.3) with no significant change over the period under scrutiny. Comparing these estimates to results obtained from other studies suggest that intergenerational mobility is higher in France than in the United States and United Kingdom and lower than in Scandinavian countries.

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Paper provided by Institut d'economie publique (IDEP), Marseille, France in its series IDEP Working Papers with number 0401.

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Length: 34 pages
Date of creation: Feb 2004
Date of revision: Feb 2004
Handle: RePEc:iep:wpidep:0401
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  24. Osterbacka, Eva, 2001. " Family Background and Economic Status in Finland," Scandinavian Journal of Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 103(3), pages 467-84, September.
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