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The Inheritance of Inequality

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  • Samuel Bowles
  • Herbert Gintis

Abstract

How level is the intergenerational playing field? What are the causal mechanisms that underlie the intergenerational transmission of economic status? Are these mechanisms amenable to public policies in a way that would make the attainment of economic success more fair? These are the questions we will try to answer.

Suggested Citation

  • Samuel Bowles & Herbert Gintis, 2002. "The Inheritance of Inequality," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 16(3), pages 3-30, Summer.
  • Handle: RePEc:aea:jecper:v:16:y:2002:i:3:p:3-30
    Note: DOI: 10.1257/089533002760278686
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    References listed on IDEAS

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