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Assessing Intergenerational Earnings Persistence Among German Workers

  • Pfeiffer, Friedhelm
  • Eisenhauer, Philipp

In this study we assess the relationship between father and son earnings among (West) German Workers. To reduce the lifecycle and attenuation bias a novel sampling procedure is developed and applied to the German Socio-Economic Panel (SOEP) 1984-2006. Our preferred point estimate indicates that about 1/3 of the earnings differential in the labor market has been passed on from the generation of fathers to their sons.

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File URL: http://econstor.eu/bitstream/10419/24708/1/dp08014.pdf
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Paper provided by ZEW - Zentrum für Europäische Wirtschaftsforschung / Center for European Economic Research in its series ZEW Discussion Papers with number 08-014.

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Date of creation: 2008
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Handle: RePEc:zbw:zewdip:7223
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