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Struktur und Ausmaß der intergenerationalen Einkommensmobilität in Deutschland

  • Daniel D. Schnitzlein

    ()

    (IAB Nürnberg)

The paper examines the structure and the extent of intergenerational income mobility in Germany. Using data from the German Socio-economic Panel it is possible to look at both, fatherson and father-daughter pairs. In the present case the intergenerational income elasticity is 0.26 for father-son pairs and 0.36 for father-daughter pairs. A more detailed analysis is carried out, applying a quantile regression approach. In a third step I estimate the transition matrices of sons. Although there is some persistence at both ends of the income distribution, the results show a high level of intergenerational mobility in Germany.

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Article provided by Justus-Liebig University Giessen, Department of Statistics and Economics in its journal Journal of Economics and Statistics.

Volume (Year): 229 (2009)
Issue (Month): 4 (August)
Pages: 450-466

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Handle: RePEc:jns:jbstat:v:229:y:2009:i:4:p:450-466
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  1. Gary S. Becker & Nigel Tomes, . "Human Capital and the Rise and Fall of Families," University of Chicago - Population Research Center 84-10, Chicago - Population Research Center.
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  7. Peter Gottschalk & Minh Huynh, 2006. "Are Earnings Inequality and Mobility Overstated? The Impact of Non-Classical Measurement Error," Boston College Working Papers in Economics 649, Boston College Department of Economics.
  8. Corak, Miles, 2006. "Do Poor Children Become Poor Adults? Lessons from a Cross Country Comparison of Generational Earnings Mobility," IZA Discussion Papers 1993, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
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  12. Becker, Gary S & Tomes, Nigel, 1979. "An Equilibrium Theory of the Distribution of Income and Intergenerational Mobility," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 87(6), pages 1153-89, December.
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  15. Peter Gottschalk & John Fitzgerald & Robert Moffitt, 1997. "An Analysis of the Impact of Sample Attrition on the Second Generation of Respondents in the Michigan Panel Study of Income Dynamics," Boston College Working Papers in Economics 399, Boston College Department of Economics.
  16. Bhashkar Mazumder, 2002. "Earnings Mobility in the US: A New Look at Intergenerational Inequality," Working Papers 02-11, Center for Economic Studies, U.S. Census Bureau.
  17. Simona Comi, 2003. "Intergenerational mobility in Europe: evidence from ECHP," Departmental Working Papers 2003-03, Department of Economics, Management and Quantitative Methods at Università degli Studi di Milano.
  18. Solon, Gary, 1999. "Intergenerational mobility in the labor market," Handbook of Labor Economics, in: O. Ashenfelter & D. Card (ed.), Handbook of Labor Economics, edition 1, volume 3, chapter 29, pages 1761-1800 Elsevier.
  19. Solon, Gary, 1989. "Biases in the Estimation of Intergenerational Earnings Correlations," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 71(1), pages 172-74, February.
  20. Thorsten Vogel, 2006. "Reassessing Intergenerational Mobility in Germany and the United States: The Impact of Differences in Lifecycle Earnings Patterns," SFB 649 Discussion Papers SFB649DP2006-055, Sonderforschungsbereich 649, Humboldt University, Berlin, Germany.
  21. Anders Bohlmark & Matthew J. Lindquist, 2006. "Life-Cycle Variations in the Association between Current and Lifetime Income: Replication and Extension for Sweden," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 24(4), pages 879-900, October.
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